National Park Quiz 12: The Fair Sex

Do you recognize this woman? The first National Historic Site dedicated to the accomplishments of a woman was created in her honor. National Park Service photo.

Editor's note: OK, so we put the word “sex” in the quiz title just to boost readership. But hey; that doesn’t mean we’re sexist. It just means we’re venal.

1. When it was established in 1974, the ______ became the first National Historic Site dedicated to the accomplishments of a woman.
a. Mary McLeod Bethune Council House National Historic Site
b. Clara Barton National Historic Site
c. Maggie L. Walker National Historical Site
d. Eleanor Roosevelt National Historic Site

2. In 1995, then-First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton traveled to the Eleanor Roosevelt National Historic Site to make a speech and receive the ______ Medal, which is named for the cottage that was Eleanor Roosevelt’s home and is now the park’s centerpiece attraction.
a. Toll-Kill
b. Sort-Kill
c. Val-Kill
d. Road-Kill

3. A statue honoring women for military service is a component of the
a. Korean War Veterans Memorial
b. Air Force Memorial
c. Vietnam Veterans Memorial
d. World War II Memorial

4. The ______ is a National Park System unit located in Seneca Falls, New York.
a. Women's Rights National Historical Park
b. Maggie L. Walker National Historical Site
c. Mary McLeod Bethune Council House National Historic Site
d. Women in Military Service for America Memorial

5. The Maggie L. Walker National Historical Site honors the first female in America to
a. hold a cabinet-level position in the U.S. government
b. earn a law degree and be admitted to the bar
c. found and direct a bank
d. earn a medical degree and become a surgeon

6. The Mary McLeod Bethune Council House National Historic Site is a townhouse located in
a. Philadelphia
b. Washington, DC
c. New York City
d. Boston

7. Among the noteworthy events that took place in what is now the Women's Rights National Historical Park was the
a. organizing of the Women’s March on Washington
b. founding of the National Organization for Women
c. election of America’s first woman mayor
d. staging of the first Women’s Rights Convention

8. The Rosie the Riveter/World War II Home Front National Historical Park is in
a. Richmond, California, where Rosies helped make Victory ships
b. Newark, New Jersey, where Rosies helped make Sherman tanks
c. Everett, Washington, where Rosies helped make B-17 and B-25 bombers
d. Detroit, Michigan, where Rosies helped make trucks and heavy artillery

9. The Clara Barton National Historic Site is administered by the
a. George Washington Memorial Parkway
b. Richmond National Battlefield Park
c. Gateway National Recreation Area
d. American Red Cross

10. The Pro Football Hall of Fame is on George Halas Drive in Canton, Ohio. One of Canton’s other attractions is a national park honoring women. It is listed below with three bogus “parks” that don’t exist. Which is the real national park in Canton?
a. American Women Suffrage National Historical Park
b. Daughters of the American Revolution National Historic Site
c. Daughters of Bilitis National Historic Site
d. First Ladies National Historic Site

Extra credit

11. At ______, one of the things that visitors learn is that “mill girls” were among the first workers in America to strike for higher wages and a shorter work day.
a. Lowell National Historical Park
b. Chesapeake & Ohio Canal Historical Park
c. Adams National Historical Park
d. Morristown National Historical Park

Super bonus question

12. The ______ had a visitation of 59,846 in 2007. This visitor tally is more than double that of any of the others listed below.
a. Mary McLeod Bethune Council House National Historic Site
b. First Ladies National Historic Site
c. Women's Rights National Historical Park
d. Eleanor Roosevelt National Historic Site

Answers: (1) b (2) c (3) c (4) a (5) c (6) b (7) d (8) a (9) a (10) d (11) a (12) d The 2007 visitation for the other three was as follows: Mary McLeod Bethune Council House NHS = 17,324; First Ladies NHS = 10,881; and Women's Rights National Historical Park = 18,657

Grading: 9 or 10 correct, rest on your laurels; 7 or 8 correct, pretty darn good; 6 correct, passably fair; 5 or fewer correct, nothing to brag about.

Comments


Thanks for the interesting Quiz, Bob, but what if we don't want to rest on our laurels?? Or shouldn't !

I am concerned that Lowell may be wrong in claiming their priority on strikes by women.

My understanding is that in Pawtucket RI and Troy NY women had way larger and earlier roles in leading and participating in strikes than in Lowell. But I am no historian.

So, before we let ourselves rest on the laurels of conventional wisdom, or Received Word, do you, or does anyone know the real truth about women in the labor movement, not just the Lowell hype??

"Among the first" (1834, 1836) is a true statement, though obviously not as conceptually tidy as you'd like. :-) There were several strikes (then called "turn-outs"), including at least three in the textile industry, in the late 1820s and early 1830s. (There were some "strikes" (worker mutinies/rebellions) before that time, to be sure, but the wages & hours criterion becomes a bit dicey.) Anyway, the statement in the item stem doesn't lead you in the direction of a wrong answer. I'm glad you enjoyed the quiz.