You are here

Woman Dies in Fall From Angels Landing At Zion National Park

Share

A woman apparently hiking alone to the summit of Angels Landing has fallen to her death. Photo of Angels Landing by QT Luong, used with permission. www.terragalleria.com/parks

A woman hiking up Angels Landing in Zion National Park apparently tripped and fell about 1,000 feet to her death, according to park officials.

The woman, who was not immediately identified, was thought to be hiking alone when she fell around 2 p.m. Friday, District Ranger Ray O'Neil said this morning.

"She was a third of the way from Scout Lookout to the top," the ranger said. "We're still looking into it at this point. It just sounds like a terrible accident."

Weather apparently wasn't a factor, as it was sunny with temperatures in the 50s and low 60s, he said. There were others in the area who saw her fall, and they were interviewed by rangers.

While there are chains along some sections of the trail that hikers can hold onto as they go up and down, the woman was thought to be in an area where there were no chains, said the ranger.

“It’s roughly in the saddle area. When you go from Scout Lookout you go up just a little bit and then you go down just a little bit before you go on the big ascent to the top," he said. More details were expected later today.

The last hiker to die along the route was a California woman who fell in August.

Comments

Well, I'd like to close with the following observation:

Angel's Landing is an appropriately named for a trail because everyone who landed became an angel. Amen.


I have hiked Angels Landing two times. I have a life time goal to see every National Park. I love Zion and Angels Landing. However, there is an assumed risk in many aspects of life. If you do this trail take your time and hug the chains. But, people need to enjoy life, just be careful!


Ah, but here's the trouble with Wikipedia--anyone can edit an article to say whatever they please. Bottarini fell to her death from the Observation Point trail, not Angels Landing.


Patricia Bottarini fell (or was allegedly pushed) to her death from the Observation Point trail, not Angels Landing.


I'm in awe of anyone that has the courage to climb AL. I'm very fascinated and also scared to death of heights, the pictures are truly breathtaking. While I have no desire to climb AL, I fully appreciate others that are able to do these daring acts. The freedom to experience our country's National Parks is what they were protected and proclaimed for. Enjoyment of any kind always comes with risks, enjoy and be as careful as you can.


Anonymous:
Whilst I do not have data to support my hypothesis I suspect that the death toll of this trail is significantly less than many trails that are considered relativey easy walks - Vernal Fall in Yosemite comes mind.

I suppose you mean from the Mist Trail all the way up to Vernal Fall and Emerald Pool/Silver Apron.

I don't think they've had many fatalities from normal "responsible" hiking. The only example I recall was someone who was hiking up in heavy rain, and slipped/fell off the trail into the Merced River. Most of the fatalities I've heard of are from people doing stuff they're not supposed to such as jump on the rocks, swimming in the Emerald Pool or sliding down the Silver Apron.

I heard about one NPS employee who collapsed and died on the Mist Trail while investigating another fatality.

The gist I get from most Angels Landings fatalities is that people weren't being reckless by doing something stupid like jump across wet rocks.


Thanks for all of your comments. Tammy was a GREAT person and a good friend. She was an extremely helpful, caring and a compassionate person. Her death is a big loss for all. I wish I could have been there to stop her fall!


We hiked the trail the day before this event. I went to the top; my companion chose to stop at Scout's landing. It is a spectacular trail. It is indeed high, and requires appropriate care. It is also considerably less difficult and dangerous than many - in and out of national Parks, both in the US and in other countries. Whilst I do not have data to support my hypothesis I suspect that the death toll of this trail is significantly less than many trails that are considered relativey easy walks - Vernal Fall in Yosemite comes mind. That someone lost their life is a tragedy. It would be even more so if access to every "dangerous place" in this world were restricted, or every trail became a Disney style carnival ride with big signposts and guard rails the entire distance. Ultimately people must be responsible for their own actions.


Add comment

CAPTCHA

This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.

National Parks Traveler's Essential Park Guide

Recent Forum Comments