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Reader Participation Day: Has Arizona's Approach To Controlling Illegal Immigrants Led You To Cancel a Grand Canyon Trip?

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The Grand Canyon, as viewed from Mohave Point. NPS photo.

Are you rethinking that trip to the Grand Canyon or Saguaro National Park due to the approach Arizona officials are taking towards illegal immigration?

Arizona's move to require police to check anyone's U.S. residency status if it might be in doubt is drawing quite a bit of criticism. Already there's some evidence that folks from outside Arizona who oppose the law are canceling trips to the Grand Canyon State.

Are you?

Comments

When a person is found to be illegal in this country, tell them they have a choice to return to their country or to be given full citizenship with the condition that they be drafted into one of the armed forces of this country for a certain amount of time. They'll be given a crash course on how to be a US citizen, educated, employed and we'll boost our defences at the same time.


AZ Lisa:
y_p_w, I don't understand your point.

Which one? I had two. The first was that drug and human smuggling isn't going to be alleviated with the simple deportation that might be accomplished by this statute. Anyone actually caught for drug/human smuggling could be facing serious jail time. Anyone who might be a human/drug smuggler but is only caught without the proper documents is probably just going to be deported to Mexico where the cycle can repeat.

The other one was simply to say that human smuggling isn't only a problem at Arizona's border with Mexico.

And CAPTCHA for today is "thing crackdown".


y_p_w, I don't understand your point.

Back to the original point, I'm disheartened that I probably won't get to see the beautiful mountain islands in southern Arizona again. It is beautiful...like a grassy savanna with mesquites and cottonwoods dotting the hills and high mountains in the distance. ***SIGH****


AZ Lisa:
The illegal immigration fuels the horrific activity of the drug smugglers and coyotes that prey on both the immigrants as well as Americans that get in their way. Of course I won't let American illicit drug users or employers of illegal labor off the hook either. But the coyotes and drug smugglers are the scum of the earth.

I've got no argument that drug smugglers should somehow be protected. However - they're still going to do it if the profit motive is there. If they're smuggling drugs on a regular basis, getting deported is hardly going to be a deterrent. If they're simply picked up for immigration violations, they'll be right back in Mexico where they'll hook up with their employers and do it over again. What good is deportation for someone who by definition is illegally crossing the border repeatedly. The drug and human smuggling is going to happen. If there are increased rates of deportation, I would guess that it might even increase the rate of human trafficking as people try to get back into the US.

Human smuggling to the US frankly isn't just a concern only along the Mexico-US border. There are the infamous "Snakehead" criminal organizations, who bring in migrants (primarily from Fujian province) in China to the US in cargo ships. There was the infamous ship Golden Venture that ran aground in Queens, NY with several passengers drowning trying to flee to the shore and escape capture. A similar operation was detailed in the movie Lethal Weapon 4, with a group of illegal migrants found in a modular ship cargo container in the Port of Los Angeles. Illegal immigration is a huge deal in New York City's Chinatown as well as Chinese communities around the US.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_Venture


Rick,

Wow! That's cool. Thanks for bringing it to my attention. I always wondered about that and I'll look into it.

However, the fact that National Park Rangers have a more dangerous job than FBI agents and that National Parks along the Mexican border are the most dangerous still stands.

Lisa


Lisa--

I assume you are talking about Paul Fugate when you mention an unsolved murder in Chiricahua NM. To my knowledge, neither the Cochise County Sheriff not the National Park Service definitivley concluded the Paul was the victim of a crime. See the Traveler story, "Where in the world is Paul Fugate", published in March of 2009.

Rick


Kurt-

My sincerest thanks to you for being an honest broker moderator! :-)
Happy hiking...it was a beautiful season, but I too ran across a whopper rattlesnake this spring that scared the bajeebas out of me.

Justin -

The illegal immigration fuels the horrific activity of the drug smugglers and coyotes that prey on both the immigrants as well as Americans that get in their way. Of course I won't let American illicit drug users or employers of illegal labor off the hook either. But the coyotes and drug smugglers are the scum of the earth.

Lisa


Kurt-

Rincon and Saguaro are well above the areas you have to be concerned about. They are both adjacent to a major metropolitan area...Tucson. The areas I'm concerned about are adjacent to the border. The Chiricahuas are in such a remote area, jaguars have been spotted in the park. You should also be aware that there is still an unsolved murder of a park ranger in 1980.

As reported by the National Geographic in 2003, Arizona's Organ Pipe National Monument was the most dangerous in the country. It also attested to the cross-cut trails created by illegal activity and the trashing of the desert with strewn clothing and water bottles. As they reported:

"Rangers say it was only a matter of time before tragedy struck in one of the five national parks and monuments along the U.S.-Mexican border, where shoot-outs occur with alarming frequency."

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2003/01/0110_030113_organpipecly...

Thank you,
Lisa


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