Where Can You See Wildlife Right Now: Peregrine Falcons At Acadia National Park

If you're visiting Acadia from now into August, check out the peregrine falcon watching opportunities from the Precipice Trail parking area. The chick's photo was taken after biologists fitted it with a leg band. NPS photos.

Though you'll probably need a good pair of binoculars or a spotting scope, peregrine falcons and their chicks should be somewhat visible at Acadia National Park from now into August.

In the park, peregrines have been seen in past years nesting on cliffs above the Precipice, East Face, and Jordan Cliffs trails, and the northern section of the Flying Mountain Trail. As a result, sections of those trails often are closed during nesting season so the birds aren't disturbed. You can check on closures at this page.

As far as spotting these birds, in early June park officials say young falcons might be seen as "tiny white snowballs" at the edge of the nest cliff. "Their markings will change as they mature. They may flap their wings to build strength for flight. They take their first flights between mid-June and early July."

From July through August the young birds work on their flying skills, and often you can spot them flying above the cliffs or elsewhere in Mount Desert island. Park biologists say the birds might perch on cliff ledges or in snags -- dead trees.

You can enhance your odds of seeing one of the birds by attending one of the park's falcon watch programs. These programs are offered most days from mid-May through mid-August, weather permitting, from 9 a.m. to noon at the Precipice Trail parking area.

Rangers or volunteers will be there to help you spot the birds, and viewing scopes will be available to check out activity on the cliff.

Comments

I've been to these. They're excellent. These type of viewing experiences are really a credit to the Park Servce. The volunteers do a great job also. (Ranger Lora was the ranger when I visited.)

Also, the rangers, volunteers and visitors will bring telescopes during the activity times listed in the Beaver Log, the official Acadia Newspaper.