Visiting Hawaii? Check Out These Programs At Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park In January

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A rich variety of programming, including some focusing on the volcanic underpinnings of Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, will be offered in January. USGS photo.

If you're planning to visit Hawaii in January, check out these "after dark" programs that will be offered at Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park. Since January is also Volcano Awareness Month, some of the programs will offer insights into the Earth's molten plumbing. All programs are free, but park entrance fees apply. Programs are co-sponsored by the Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association, and your $2 donation helps support park programs. Mark the calendar for these upcoming events:

* Kīlauea Volcano’s East Rift Zone: 31 Years and Still Erupting. Jan. 3, 2014, marks the 31st anniversary of Kīlauea Volcano’s ongoing East Rift Zone eruption. During its first three years, spectacular lava fountains spewed episodically from the Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō vent. Since then, nearly continuous lava effusion has built a vast plain of pāhoehoe lava that stretches from the volcano’s rift zone to the sea. Although the eruption has produced dramatic lava flows in past years, it has been relatively subdued in recent years, with mostly steady, but unusually weak, activity. Tim Orr, a geologist with the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, will review highlights from the past 31 years and talk about recent developments on the volcano’s East Rift Zone. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.

When: Tues., Jan. 7 from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

* Traditional Lei Making. Ab Kawainohoikala‘i Valencia is a kumu hula, or teacher of hula. He has taught his students at Hālau Hula Kalehuaki‘eki‘eika‘iu since 1996, where lei making is a vital and important part of their tradition. Join Ab and his wife Puamae‘ole O’Mahoney as they continue to teach traditional lei making. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.

When: Wed., Jan. 8, from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.

Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

* Happenings in Halema‘uma‘u: An Update on Kīlauea Volcano’s Summit Eruption. In March 2008, a new volcanic vent opened within Halema‘uma‘u Crater at the summit of Kīlauea. Since then, the eruption has consisted of continuous degassing, occasional explosive events, and fluctuating lava lake activity in an open crater that is now 520’ x 690’ in size. While thousands of visitors flock to see the nighttime glow emitted by the lava lake, the volcano’s summit eruption also provides an abundance of data and insights for scientists. USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologist Matt Patrick will present an update on Kīlauea Volcano’s summit eruption, including an overview of the volcanic processes occurring within the vent. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.

When: Tues., Jan. 14, from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

* Kai Ho‘opi‘i in Concert. Come enjoy an evening of Hawaiian music, through the sweet voice of Kai Ho‘opi‘i, sharing the music of his ‘ohana from Kahakuloa, Maui. Kai is a winner of the Aloha Festivals Hawaiian falsetto signing contest. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing Nā Leo Manu “Heavenly Voices” presentations. Free.

When: Wed., Jan. 15 from 6:30 to 8 p.m.

Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

* Earthquakes and Explosions: Shocking events at Kāpoho and Halema‘uma‘u in 1924. In April 1924, Kāpoho residents were evacuated as hundreds of earthquakes shook their village. In the weeks that followed, huge explosions wracked the summit of Kīlauea Volcano. Using USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory logs, geologic field notes, National Park Service reports, newspaper accounts, photographs, and other records from 1924, Ben Gaddis, a long-time HVO volunteer, will tell the story of Kīlauea Volcano’s most violent eruption of the 20th century from the perspective of the people who lived through it. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.

When: Tues., Jan. 21 from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

* Kapa Kuiki: Traditional Hawaiian Quilting. Cyndy Leinani Martinez has been practicing the art of kapa kuiki since she was old enough to hold a needle, learning from her mother and grandmother about the family craft. Always passionate, Cyndy has kept the family traditions alive for more than 60 years, and is now president of the quilting club in Waimea. Join this experienced, third generation quilter as she shares the traditional art of Hawaiian quilting. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.

When: Wed., Jan. 22, from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.

Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

* Decades of Degassing at Kīlauea: Wake Up and Smell the Coughing! As magma rises from the Earth’s mantle to the surface, the expansion of volcanic gases drives the spectacular lava fountains and flows erupted by Hawaiian volcanoes. While Kīlauea still produces picturesque lava flows from its East Rift Zone, and its summit crater hosts a dynamic lava pond, it also releases huge amounts of volcanic gases which have negatively impacted downwind communities, agriculture, and infrastructure for years. Jeff Sutton and Tamar Elias, USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geochemists, will offer an update about these gases, especially those related to the 2008‐2013 activity at Halema‘uma‘u Crater, and will talk about volcanic pollution (vog)—how it forms and what we’ve learned about its effects on our island environment. An optional “gas- tasting” party will follow the talk. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.

When: Tues., Jan. 28 from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium