Who are the National Park Travelers?

A list of the folks who have created profiles on the website. If you'd like to add yourself to this list, create an account, and after you've logged in, you can edit your biography.

  • Ruffin Prevost is founding editor of Yellowstone Gate, an independent, online news site offering community news and inside views about Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks and their gateway communities.

    He lives in Cody, Wyo. where he also works as the Wyoming reporter for Reuters America Wire. He has previously worked as managing editor of WyoFile, a statewide news service about Wyoming people, places and policy. From 2005-2010, he was the Wyoming reporter for the Billings Gazette. Contact him at or 307-213-9818.

  • Currently a graduate student at the University of Nebraska, I spent the summer of 2006 living, working, and playing in Yellowstone National Park, and left smitten and grateful for our national parks.

  • I'm the communications director for the International Mountain Bicycling Association, more commonly referred to as IMBA.

  • David Menzies is Director of Marketing and Public Relations at OBX Outfitters, a woman-owned casual apparel and activewear company sharing the pure joy that is the Outer Banks and especially the Cape Hatteras National Seashore. He is a PR professional and writer, sharing news and blogging about OBX at the Outer Banks Update, www.outerbanksupdate.com.

    He and his wife Stacy, President of OBX Outfitters, are dedicated to contributing to the economic and environmental strength of North Carolina, with clothing made right here in NC, USA. From Corolla down to Ocracoke, they support the communities in which they do business, donating time and a portion of our profits to local civic groups and nonprofits.

  • A critically-acclaimed historian of the national parks, Alfred Runte lives in Seattle. In April 2011, he was inducted into the College of Arts and Sciences Hall of Fame at Illinois State University (his master’s degree institution) “in recognition of exemplary achievement” as a teacher and public scholar. He also holds a B.A. from the State University of New York at Binghamton (now Binghamton University) and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Santa Barbara.

  • Lisa Lance is a writer and communications specialist living in the Baltimore area. www.lisalance.com

  • With more than 60 combined years of award-winning journalistic experience, much of it tied to public lands, national parks, wildlife, and the environment, Editor-in-Chief Kurt Repanshek and Travel Editor Randy Johnson have a long list of credits in such magazines as Audubon, Backpacker, Hemispheres, Smithsonian and Sunset, as well as a best-selling collection of park guidebooks to their credit.


    National Parks Traveler
    is not affiliated with the National Park Service. Our mission is clear: National Parks Traveler works to educate the general public about the National Park System, increase awareness and understanding of issues affecting the national parks and the National Park Service, and build a stronger advocacy for protection and sound stewardship of the parks.Since being launched in August 2005, National Parks Traveler has evolved into the Internet's top-ranked editorially independent site for news, commentary, and features revolving around the national parks and the National Park Service. With a robust and growing audience of more than 1.2 million readers a year, the Traveler is the only website that provides a steady, daily dose of fresh editorial content on the parks.

    The Traveler endorses and actively supports the National Park Service Organic Act of 1916 that mandated a high standard of protection for the parks, as well as the Redwoods Act of 1978 that reemphasized the Organic Act’s stewardship provisions and affirmed that they are to be applied on a system-wide basis.

    Traveler seeks to work in ways that are consistent with the National Park Service’s fundamental purpose for managing the parks, which is “to conserve the scenery and the natural and historic objects and the wildlife therein and to provide for the enjoyment of the same in such manner and by such means as will leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of future generations."

  • Steve Myers is the founder of the vision for the Great Plains National Scenic Trail. His experience with national praks dates to 1990 when he applied for a dishwashing job at Signal Mountain Lodge in Grand Teton national Park . . . and landed it! His love affair with national parks and hiking began there, and eventually led to the idea currently on the table: The Great Plains Trail!

  • Stacey Wittig is a freelance travel writer based in Flagstaff, Arizona. She'll give you the local's insider scoop on where to stay, eat and have fun at Grand Canyon National Park. Stacey's Grand Canyon adventures have led her down the Kaibab Trail to Phantom Ranch, across the North Rim on her mountain bike, and floating through layers of time on a whitewater river trip. "The Grand Canyon State is a remarkable place to call home," declares the wandering writer. She welcomes comments and questions at www.vagabondinglulu.com.

  • Robin, a lover of travel and adventure, has visited 16 National Parks in the last year. She is a rock climber, hiker, runner, and writer.

  • Ashley is an avid traveler of America's National Parks. Her favorites include Great Smoky Mountains National Park and Shenandoah National Park. She is committed to raising awareness of the importance National Parks have, focusing her writing endeavors on travel and recreation in the natural world. Ashley currently writes as the National Great Smoky Mountains National Park Examiner.

  • Miranda Altman works in the music education nonprofit sector. An avid hiker and outdoor enthusiast, she travels extensively throughout our country's national parks. She is currently working toward a lifelong goal of visiting and documenting each of the 58 National Parks in the United States. Miranda is a graduate of the University of New Hampshire with a dual degree in Geography and Communications.

  • I'm a professor emeritus of history at the University of Missouri-Columbia with a keen interest in environmental affairs. I've worked worked closely with the Aldo Leopold family and the Foundation for years, as well as with many other organizations, including Audubon.

  • I grew up in Kentucky where my family took frequent vacations to visit National Parks, mainly Shenandoah National Park and Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Following graduation from Centre College in Danville, Kentucky, with a degree in history, I took a 10,000-mile road trip across the United States.

    Along the way, I visited 27 national parks and fell in love with the Northwest. I then attended law school at Lewis & Clark Law School in Portland, Oregon. I graduated with a JD and a Certificate in Environmental and Natural Resources Law and was awarded the Environmental Leadership Award for my work on environmental issues while in law school.

  • Mountain lions ,Need to be protected in the US ,We do not need to kill or waist a life of our national symbol mountain lions are a beutifull animal .

  • I'm a Survey Specialist in the Park Studies Unit (PSU) at the University of Idaho. The PSU conducts social science research for NPS and other agencies. (Check us out at psu.uidaho.edu.) I was an interpreter at Grand Canyon, Denali, Grand Teton, and Lassen Volcanic, and I love the NPS!

  • I'm a life-long nature lover who seeks to preserve the land that God has given us. It is our duty to take care of these lands, protecting them from those without care or consideration for the world they live in. I truly believe that it is the parks that make this nation great. I donate much of my earnings through my trade: decorative coatings and powder coating dye sublimation to the parks, nature and animal preserves. If there is more that I can do to help, please let me know.

  • I'm a professor of political science at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. My research and teaching focuses focuses on environmental politics, U.S. national parks, and the European Union.

    My blog, "Parking Lots," covers national park and wilderness topics: http://publish.illinois.edu/pahre/ . You can also follow me on Twitter, @RPahre .

    I teach a summer course on the Politics of the Greater Yellowstone Area. Non-degree students are welcome to apply, as are students at other universities. Information is here:
    http://publish.illinois.edu/pahre/study-in-yellowstone-this-summer/

    I've authored both academic and non-academic publications on the national parks. You can find the full list here: http://publish.illinois.edu/pahre/pahres-research/

    I've written articles the Traveler on Agate Fossil Beds National Monument, David Berger National Memorial, Dinosaur National Monument, Grand Teton National Park, Nicodemus National Historic Site, and Yellowstone National Park. Check out associated photos on Flickr:

    Agate: http://www.flickr.com/photos/rpahre/sets/72157631200362314/

    Dinosaur: http://www.flickr.com/photos/13467208@N02/sets/72157626793458381/

    Grand Tetons: http://www.flickr.com/photos/rpahre/sets/72157626955402180/

    Nicodemus: http://www.flickr.com/photos/rpahre/sets/72157629540472372/

    Yellowstone: http://www.flickr.com/photos/rpahre/sets/72157626830958743/

    My favorite national park photos are here:
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/13467208@N02/sets/72157626031350246/

  • Bill Atwill is Associate Director of the Honors College at UNCW. He holds a PhD in English from Duke University. An avid surfer, cyclist, backpacker and hiker, he is interested in literature and the environment with a particular focus on narrative responses to life along the seacoast in American literature. He leads week-long trips to various national parks as part of the National Collegiate Honors Council's Partners in the Parks initiative.

  • I'm a wilderness advocate and nature writer whose resume lists a dozen books and a wealth of articles and essays. (Traveler reviewed my book, Changing Paths: Travels and Meditations in Alaska's Arctic Wilderness, back in January 2010).

  • Jon Jarvis is the director of the National Park Service.

  • The Natchez Trace National Historic Parkway is just across my boundary line. Got interested in that park as a very young child and it stays interesting now that I am in my mid 50s. There is a deer trail that runs as far north as I have yet followed it, a reminder of what park historians say is the way the Trace started. There is something wonderous about going out and standing in the woods, looking at that trail and thinking that if I wanted to, I could set out on it and, with minor deviations, walk 350 miles north on it, or turn around and walk 107 miles south. All without seeing more than a smidgin of modern life.

    Dad took me to the Smokies in '58 and got me hooked on the park there. Coming home, Grandpa got me hooked on the Trace. In my childs' mind, I figured that somehow the Trace would take me to the Smokies. Well, my cousins live up there, just outside the Smokies, in view of Chilhowee Mountain. So there was a bit more to it than just park.

  • I am currently working on a PhD in Geography at Florida State Univeristy. I am researching issues of Indigenous Spatial Knowledge and how government agencies deals with the issues involved. I was a Xanterra employee at Grant Village Lodge in summer of 2008. I try to vacation at least once a year at a National Park, especially the western parks.

  • I live in north east Texas, Fort Worth I enjoy camping, fishing, Hiking and taking pictures of nature.

  • I'm a writer and outdoor educator based in Park City, Utah. Having spent 10 years working in communications and interpretation at three national parks (Big Bend, Yellowstone, and Yosemite, if you're wondering), I now use writing to tell the stories of national parks and other wild places.

    I also works as an outdoor educator for a local guiding company and a state nature preserve. Find my Internet home here (http://www.meghanmhicks.com).

  • Ian Shive is an award-winning conservation photographer, author and multimedia producer whose goal is to captivate audiences through new trends in story telling using imagery as the primary tool.

    Ian is the recent recipient of the Gold Medal, 2010 Nautilus Book Award, in the Great Peacekeepers category in recognition of his top-selling book The National Parks: Our American Landscape, released in August 2009 on Earth Aware Editions, for promoting “spiritual growth, conscious living and positive social change…and offering the reader "new possibilities" for a better life and world, joining previous Nautilus Award winners including Deepak Chopra, M.D., Eckhart Tolle, and His Holiness the Dalai Lama, among others.

    Referred to as the leading chronicler of America’s National Parks today and a self-labeled “wilderness diplomat,” Ian and his book The National Parks: Our American Landscape were the focus of a presentation on the challenges facing America’s most beloved landscapes in Washington, D.C. in November 2009, hosted by Senators Sheldon Whitehouse and Max Baucus.

  • Tom Till is one of America's most published photographers. Over 150,000 of his images have appeared in print since 1977. In 1998, Till opened the Tom Till Gallery in Moab, Utah. Till's
    images depict landscape, nature, history, and travel subjects worldwide, including all fifty states and nearly sixty countries overseas.

    Till's stock photography images have been featured by National Geographic Magazine, The New York Times, Outside Magazine, Canon Copiers, Delta Airlines, The New Yorker Magazine, Life Magazine, Browntrout Calendars, Eastman Kodak, Reader's Digest, Rand McNally, MGM, Arizona Highways, Lonely Planet, and thousands of others.

    An exhibit of his images of UNESCO World Heritage Sites has been traveling the world for almost three years, with stops in Paris, Brussels, Copenhagen, Geneva and Oslo, among others.

    Though Till has been known as a master of the large format (4x5) camera and film for over 30 years, he has switched to 35mm digital Canon equipment. Recent trips have taken him to South Africa, Brazil, the Caribbean, Thailand, Laos, Myanmar, Viet Nam, Denmark, Sweden, and Slovenia, and numerous sites in the United States. A 35-year resident of Moab, Utah, Till has one of the largest photo libraries in existence of the Four Corners region.

  • I love to go visiting the National Parks, and have been lucky to go backpacking and hiking in a number of them. I also love the historical parks, since I'm a history buff and grew up near Valley Forge and Gettysburg. My husband and I are now getting our 5-year-old daughter into hiking and she did her first back-packing trip in Canyonlands this spring.

  • I'm the partnership coordinator for the Tongass National Forest, duty stationed in Ketchikan, Alaska.

    From a very young age, I've enjoyed our national parks and public lands, but I've taken a convoluted path to this career. Other hats I've worn include motorsports PR manager, editorial writer, sports journalist and park ranger-interpreter. I hold an MS in recreation from Indiana University and a BS in journalism from the University of Idaho.

  • I was first lured into the world of the NPS by way of the Wonderful World of Disney, through their programing. Having grown up in Chicago, I never would thought that I was never going to see Yellowstone National Park. We always went to the Indiana Dunes, but that was it. After I was married, our honeymoon was spent in Rocky Mountain National Park. That was in 1980. About 5 yrs later, My husband and I went to Yellowstone for the 1st time, and we have been there numerous times afterwords. We moved to Denver and since then, we have been to Glaicer, Mesa Verde, Arches, Carlsbad Caverns, The little Big Horn, Black Canyon of the Gunnison, Pawnee National Grass lands just to name a few. I have a active interest in the Sioux wars and the settlement of the west. Thank you Dee Brown, for that interest. We go as often as we can, to the national parks. There are some that I still need to see, like how did I miss Canyonlands while I was in Moab, or Capital Reef, Zion etc. But that is the beauty of living in Denver. I am centered in a state, that I can travel to these places with in a day of driving. When I retire fulltime, then the traveling with be more intense, as that is something that Hubby and I like to do. I would also like to see as many of the national parks as I can. They are a inspiration to me.