Who are the National Park Travelers?

A list of the folks who have created profiles on the website. If you'd like to add yourself to this list, create an account, and after you've logged in, you can edit your biography.

  • Rick is a retired National Park Service employee. He served in 6 national parks, 2 regional offices, and in the Service's headquarters office in DC. Prior to his NPS career, he was a Peace Corps Volunteer, serving as a professor in the philosophy department in Paraguay's National University. He has worked extensively in Latin American as a protected area specialist.

  • Boulder, CO-based Claire Walter is an award-winning freelance writer specializing in travel, snowsports and food. She lives less than an hour from the east entrance to Rocky Mountain National National Park. The most exotic stamp in her National Parks Passport is from the Anaktuvuk Pass ranger station in Alaska's Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve.

  • Born in Nebraska in 1947...Swiss ancestory, adopted by Scotch/Dutch Irish parents, grew up in a Freestone Peach Orchard near the Missouri River...lots of iris and birds. Love Jesus because He first loved me...treasure the Creator's creation and thankful to be a part of it.

  • Bryan Faehner is the Associate Director for Park Uses at the National Parks Conservation Association (NPCA). Bryan formerly worked as a seasonal park ranger at North Cascades National Park in Washington State. Bryan has a masters degree in public land policy and law from the University of Montana and currently works in Washington, DC.

  • A while ago I gave myself the goal of visiting all of the national parks in the NPS system- a goal I share with my wife (which makes things much easier!). It was on our first big parks trip that I found that photography was to become more than a casual hobby for me.

    Now we're nearing the halfway mark on our list and I'm excited to be able to share our experiences with everyone.

    3 things you should have in your photographer's bag:

    • Lens cleaning equipment
    • Tripod (or GorillaPod)
    • Extra memory cards

    Top 3 parks everyone should visit:

    • Yosemite
    • Glacier
    • Bryce

    Top 3 parks I've visited but didn't even know existed before starting my parks quest:

    • Conyonlands
    • Cuyahoga
    • Congaree

  • Born in Richmond, Virginia.

    Father, Husband, Surfer, Sailor, Snowboarder, Skier, Hiker, Kayaker, Canoeist, Photographer, PADI Certified DiveMaster, Rescue Diver, Wreck Diving Specialist, Blended Gas Diver, Aquarist, Retired Professional Musician.

    Mechanical Engineer by trade.

    CHNSRA Property Owner since 1993. Public Land Access Activist.

  • John is the President of the National Park Traveler's Club (NPTC) - a club of enthusiasts who visit the National Parks and of collect cancellations from Eastern National's "Passport to Your National Parks" Program. The Club has currently recognized 17 individuals with its "Platinum Lifetime Achievement Award" for visiting all the Units in the National Park System. John is currently on his way to that status, having made it to 279 of the Units so far. You can visit the NPTC's website at www.parkstamps.org.

  • Jim Cureton is a retired project manager and business process consultant. He is also a photographer and musician. Jim grew up in Knoxville, TN and developed an early interest in National Parks, with regular visits to the nearby "Smokies"

    Beginning in the mid 60s, Jim began yearly trips to western national parks, particularly Grand Teton, Yellowstone, Glacier, and Yosemite, and now visits as frequently as possible.

    Some of Jim's photography can be found on his photography website at http://www.jimcureton.com

  • Richard West Sellars is a retired National Park Service historian and author of Preserving Nature in the National Parks: A History (Yale University Press, 1997, 2009). This book inspired the Natural Resource Challenge, a multi-year initiative by Congress to revitalize the Park Service’s natural resource and science programs. The Challenge made possible what Stewart Udall, former secretary of the interior, called “the greatest advances in scientific natural resource preservation in the history of the national parks.”

    Currently, Dr. Sellars is preparing a personal retrospective—a policy memoir—of his 35-year career with the National Park Service, focused on his observations of the Service’s history and its policies and practices in cultural and natural resource management. He also has underway a companion study to Preserving Nature – a history of evolving policies and practices in the management of historical and archeological areas in the National Park System. Portions of this study have been published as Pilgrim Places: Civil War Battlefields, Historic Preservation, and America’s First National Military Parks, 1863-1900, (Eastern National Press, 2005); and A Very Large Array: Early Federal Historic Preservation–The Antiquities Act, Mesa Verde, and the National Park Service Act, Natural Resources Journal (University of New Mexico School of Law, Volume 47, no.2, 2007). His most recent publication is War and Consequences: The American Indian Movement vs. the National Park Service at Fort Laramie, which appeared in National Parks Traveler, and a slightly abridged version in Indian Country Today, both in the spring of 2011.

    Sellars began his career with the National Park Service in the mid-1960s as a seasonal ranger-naturalist in Grand Teton National Park. In October 1973 he accepted a position in the Southwest Regional Office in Santa Fe, New Mexico. He spent the remainder of his Park Service career in Santa Fe, although his research, writing, teaching and other work have, in one way or another, involved virtually the entire National Park System. From 1979 to 1988, Sellars oversaw programs in history, archeology, and historic architecture for the Southwest Region, as well as Service-wide programs in underwater archeology. Special assignments have included acting superintendent in parks; and a liaison consultancy with the Dallas County Historical Foundation on preservation and interpretation of the Texas School Book Depository and Dealey Plaza, in Dallas, Texas, site of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. He has more than 370 of the 390+ units of the National Park System.

    Sellars' articles on American history and on cultural and natural resource preservation have appeared in numerous publications, among them The Washington Post, Wilderness, National Parks, Journal of Forestry, and Landscape. He has lectured on preservation philosophy, policy and practice at many universities and conferences, and for more than a decade conducted two-week courses in historic preservation for National Park Service managers. He has given presentations at a number of special meetings, including the Thomas Moran Symposium at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; Abraham Lincoln 197th Birthday Commemoration, Springfield, Illinois; the Greater Yellowstone Coalition Conference, West Yellowstone, Montana; and the Mesa Verde Centennial Archeological Conference, 2006 (keynote address).

    Sellars is a recipient of the Department of the Interior’s Meritorious Service Award; the Coalition of National Park Service Retirees’ George B. Hartzog Award; and the George Wright Society’s highest honor: the George Melendez Wright Award for Excellence, given for career-long contributions.

    In 1999 and 2000, Sellars served as president of The George Wright Society – an internationally focused organization dedicated to the preservation of natural and cultural parks and preserves. For two years he was a member of the National Park Service's National Wilderness Steering Committee. He also spent two terms on the board of the Forest History Society, and served on the Historic Design Review Board for the City of Santa Fe. In 1972 he received his doctorate in American history and literature from the University of Missouri-Columbia.

  • Jim Burnett has had the unusual opportunity to enjoy not one, but two "dream careers." Three decades as a ranger with the National Park Service took him to eight parks: Grand Canyon, Lake Mead, Glacier, Buffalo River, Big Thicket, Lincoln Boyhood, National Capital Parks and Colonial. Most of his career was spent in "protection" duties (fire, search & rescue, emergency medical services, and law enforcement), but he also had the chance to work in natural resource management and interpretation.

    Following his retirement from the NPS, Jim embarked on a new adventure as a writer. In addition to on-line pieces and several short articles in national periodicals, he's the author of two books: Hey Ranger! True Tales of Humor and Misadventure from America's National Parks and the sequel, Hey Ranger 2: More True Tales …. Jim writes primarily about the lighter side of life in the parks and sometimes describes his books as examples of what can happen "when you head west but your trip goes south." He and his wife now live in North Carolina.

  • Double Major in Economics and Environmental studies pretty much, and one of the Senior Volunteers at Boston Harbor Islands, a National Park Area

  • I'm an amateur ecologist, freelance writer, rabid birder, and avid traveler from Michigan. I just retired from a career as a marine aquarist and inland coral farmer to devote more time to writing and traveling the continent. (That's North America, not "The Continent" as the Brits call Europe!)

    You can find my ramblings at my blog Sharp Tern, and photos of my adventures at my Flickr page.

    I currently live in Lansing, Michigan with my wife Sarah and our three "kids" who happen to be Russian Tortoises we rescued.

  • Hi, I am a National Parks traveler. I love the natural beauty found in these wonderful parks. I enjoy photographing the wild life and sights. This is a great site to keep up with all the news related to the National Parks.

  • My ultimate dream is to travel to all 50 states and visit every National Park. I'm not sure if I'll ever reach that goal, but I figure the journey will be incredibly worth the effort.

  • JOHN ADORNATO III is the Director of the Sun Coast Regional Office of National Parks Conservation Association (NPCA). Since 1919, the nonpartisan National Parks Conservation Association has been the leading voice of the American people in protecting and enhancing our National Park System. The Sun Coast’s main campaigns are to work towards successful benefits of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan for the south Florida national parks and the protection of the resources and fishery of Florida Bay.

    John joined NPCA in February 2002 and focused on Everglades restoration goals for over five years. John has twice served as the National Co-Chair of the 49-member Everglades Coalition, an umbrella group of public interest, conservation and environmental organizations that advocate for the restoration of the greater Everglades ecosystem. During the past four years John has served on the Water Resources Advisory Commission to the Governing Board of the South Florida Water Management District and recently served as an environmental community representative on the advisory team to the federal government for the Everglades restoration project, Modified Water Deliveries to Everglades National Park and Florida Bay.

    Before joining NPCA, John completed the yearlong Dean John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship through the National Sea Grant Program of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. He served in the Capitol Hill office of Senator Daniel K. Akaka (D-Hawaii) managing legislative issues related to national marine sanctuaries, fisheries, ocean exploration and aquaculture. In December 2001, John received his Master’s degree from the University of Maryland in Wetland Plant Ecology. His thesis topic studied the saltwater intrusion effects of the 1996 Hurricane Lili to wetlands in the Bahamas. John holds a B.S. in Biology with a minor in Russian language from Tufts University in 1996. Originally from Springfield, MA, John attended Deerfield Academy, a college preparatory school in western Massachusetts.

  • I'm not lucky enough to work outdoors so I rely of insufficient vacation time to get out as often as possible. I've been to many of our Nat'l Parks, but hope to see them all at least once while trekking about. Love hiking, backpacking, paddling trips - whether for a day or extended. Even though I'm still living in the East (Maryland), I love every place I've been out West and hope to retire there sooner rather than later.

  • My interest in joining this forum are related to my concerns for Yosemite National Park and how the park intends to manage resources, moving forward, subsequent to the recent litigation, where the Ninth District Court has ruled in favor of Friends of Yosemite Valley, and their associates, of whom I have high respect for. As the late David Brower said, and I quote, "Yosemite should be a nature center, not a profit."
    Mr. Brower was a staunch supporter of Friends of Yosemite Valley and of their efforts to protect the park. Had he lived on, I am confident that he would be celebrating the court's recent decision.

    Yosemite will be the better for it. Fredrick Law Olmsted saw such a place and reported on it, while talking about how to preserve such an atmosphere for future generations, forever. But, no one listened.

    Because the public didn't listen to the first park planner, Mr. Olmsted, we now have to manage multiple millions of people in all manners of lodging units, who need ever wider and straighter roads, and require resturants and creature comforts to the extreme.

    Maybe we just need to remove the pavement, gravel the roads, put the tight road bends back in, and narrow them so that it isn't as easy to get there. You know, it used to take days to get there from the bay area. There may have been something good to say about that.

    Either way, I am in favor of limiting visitation, not only for the protection of Yosemite Valley, and the rest of the park, but also for the restoration of the flooded campgrounds, if the park were to go back to the planners of the 1980 Yosemite General Management Plan (the GMP) and adhere to the extensive plans that were a part of that plan that had to do with all of the campgrounds. The GMP pulled campsites away from the river and seperated them, but used all of the old real estate of the since flooded campgrounds to accomplish what should have become a camping experience for more natural that anything before or since.

    Long live the GMP, where it spoke of campground planning for Yosemite Valley, and hopefully, this court ruling will deal a death sentence to the old Yosemite Valley Plan which was rushed through to completing at the end of the Bruce Babbitt administration, a time when the then Yosemite Park Superintendent, Dave Mihalic, who was broght to the park by Babbitt to push through a hasty agenda, succeeded in destroying not only plans that were in the making for the park going back fifteen years, but also destroying the public confidence of all those who contributed to the public planning process going back to the mid 1970s, like myself.

    To rebuild trust, the new park planners need to put the Yosemite Valley Plan back on the planning table for review, in order to gain the public's trust, and to do what is right for future park visitors. In the future, we can expect that the world population will explode, and wars may expand and the morals of future generations decay, but when all of the world around Yosemite spins to a demize, we can hope that Yosemite will be a preserved and protected from these outside influences.

    We can only hope that this landmark decision by the Ninth District Court will protect Yosemite for future generations of campers, who will learn about nature the way John Muir would have recommended, from a campsite.

  • Student/Park Naturalist currently living in Lexington, Kentucky. Eric is a former NPS seasonal ranger, having worked three seasons at Wind Cave National Park and three seasons at Carlsbad Caverns National Park.

  • Stephen R. Brown has been a professional photographer and writer for twenty-five years. His images and articles on photography have appeared in Smithsonian, Life, Newsweek, Time, Fortune, the New York Times, Natonal Geographic Books, Broadcasting & Cable, American Photo, Photo Techniques, etc. His work been exhibited in solo shows here and abroad and in "Indelible Images: 100 Years of War Photography" and "Odyssey: 100 Years of NGS Photography," both of which were initiated at the Corcoran Gallery of Art and traveled around the world. His work is available at srbphoto.com

  • Hi - I'm a 59 year-old married man with two grown children. Employed by a major airline as an aircraft maintenance technician. Spent 21 years in the USAF, and I'm a VietNam vet. My wife is the world's best homemaker. My son is on active duty in the USAF. My daughter is attending law school in California.

    I love the National Parks, and I feel they are a legacy for our grandchildren's grandchildren. I enjoy hiking, camping, and sailing. I'm an animal lover. My wife and I share our home with two dogs. We recently moved to Washington state and are really looking forward to exploring the Parks here.

    I am a member of the NRA. My Dad and brother both were in the Air Force, My Dad served in Korea. My son is on active duty with the Air Force, stationed in Georgia.

    I like to think that I have an open mind.