invasive species

Everglades National Park Launches “Don’t Let It Loose” Billboard Campaign to Help Battle Invasive Species

Florida’s new “Don’t Let It Loose” Billboard Campaign is further evidence that the National Park Service and other federal and state land management agencies are getting real serious about using public education as a tool to combat the spread of harmful nonnative plant and animal species.

National Park Mystery Plant: 4: This “Tree from Hell” Smells Like Rancid Peanut Butter

This tree is an Asian import that grows fast, spreads fast, damages ecosystems and crop land, and is very tough to eradicate. It stinks, too.

Tamarisk Beetles Found in Grand Canyon National Park. "Oh, My" or "Oh, Me"?

Tamarisk killed by beetles in Utah.
Tamarisk, or salt cedar, is a highly invasive plant that has caused plenty of problems in the West. A test project to control the pest with the tamarisk leaf beetle has been underway since 2001 in parts of the country, but a few of the beetles have turned up unexpectedly in the upper end of the Grand Canyon. Will this prove to be a case of "Oh, my," or "Oh, me"?

Eradicating Everglades Pythons Will be a Formidable Task

Federal officials are finally fast-tracking efforts to eradicate Burmese pythons from the Everglades. If this can be done, and that’s a very big if, it will take teamwork, technology, hard work, and good luck.

By the Numbers: Lake Mead Quagga Mussels

Do you want to see a LOT of zeroes?

The Quagga Quandry – Coming to a Lake Near You? You'd Better Hope Not.

Zebra mussels on bottom of boat.
Those tiny mussels called Quaggas cause major problems in lakes and rivers, including those in national parks, and they're spreading across the country. If you think this won't affect you, better think again.

Creature Feature: Burmese Pythons Prowl the Everglades, and That’s Not a Good Thing

Breeding populations of Burmese pythons have been established in Everglades National Park and some other parts of Florida. Limiting the growth and spread of this ecologically disruptive, potentially dangerous invader will be a daunting task.

Creature Feature: Meet the Asian Swamp Eel, "the Animal Equivalent of the Kudzu Vine?"

The Asian swamp eel is prolific, hardy, voracious, ecologically disruptive, and on its way to becoming the scourge of the Everglades. Is it already too late to stop it?
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