A Millennial Speaks Out: How Millennials Can Save Wilderness (And The Planet)

I don’t have to take a Buzzfeed quiz to know I am the stereotypical millennial.

Guest Column| Defending The Science That Explains Climate Change

Adam Markham, director of climate impacts for the Union of Concerned Scientists' Climate and Energy Program and a co-author of the report “National Landmarks at Risk," has written the following rebuttal to Dr. Daniel B. Botkin's column on climate change and his thoughts on what is, and isn't, driving it.

Guest Column|Climate Is Changing, And Some Parks Are Endangered, But Humans Aren't The Cause

For those of us who love our national parks and are confronted daily with media, politicians, and pundits warning us of a coming global-warming disaster, it’s only natural to ask what that warming will mean for our national parks. This is exactly what the well- known Union of Concerned Scientists discuss in their recent report, National Landmarks at Risk: How Rising Seas, Floods, and Wildfires Are Threatening the UnitedStates’Most Cherished Historic Sites.

Op-Ed|The National Park Service And Wilderness: 50 Years Of Neglect

After 50 years, you would expect that the U.S. National Park Service (NPS), which administers the largest inventory of wilderness in the world, would have the best wilderness management program in the world. But, you would be very wrong.

Op-Ed: Glacier National Park's New Wildlife Photography And Viewing Policy Is Unrealistic

Most people enjoy wildlife photography. In fact, the chance to see and maybe photograph wildlife is among the top reasons people go to Glacier National Park. Are you aware that there are new viewing rules in place that may surprise you? Today, wildlife viewing and wildlife photography may be a bit more challenging based on the stringency of the new rules.

Teaching Park Politics In Yellowstone National Park

When I tell people that I teach a summer course on the politics of Yellowstone, I always brace myself for the next question. “What politics can there be in a national park?” Plenty, as it turns out.

Guest Column: Will The National Park Service Centennial Bring Positive Change Or Merely Business As Usual?

As the National Park Service approaches its centennial in 2016, is it working to improve the park system, or is it business as usual?

Guest Column: Science, Open Space, And The Future Of Our National Parks

While a report to the National Park Service on how to overhaul its approach to science in the national park is laudable, the authors of Revisiting Leopold failed to address a large issue that goes to the health of the parks -- "an abiding respect for open space."

Revisiting the Organic Act: Can It Meet the Next Century’s Conservation Challenges?

Can the National Park Service Organic Act of 1916 continue to serve the National Park Service well in its second century? Professor Robert B. Keiter, the Wallace Stegner professor of law at the University of Utah, addresses that question in the following essay.

Jane Goodall, Tom Mangelsen Choose Hope Over Spite

In the language of conservation biology, there is a term called “the Lazarus Syndrome.” It pertains to a species, written off as extinct, that later is found to exist. Today, ornithologists are debating and hoping that the near-mythical Ivory-billed woodpecker might qualify.

The Impact of Olaus, Mardy and Adolph Murie Can Still Be Felt Today in Our National Parks

They are Jackson Hole’s first family of environmental protection, this valley’s version of Aldo Leopold, John Muir, Henry David Thoreau, Margory Stoneman Douglas, and St. Francis rolled into one clan. Newcomers soon discover the progeny of the Muries, both the amazing children and grandchildren connected to them directly by bloodline and the eminently larger number of ideological descendants.

Looking Back Two Decades On Managing The Greater Yellowstone Ecoystem

It’s almost funny sometimes to look back at commotions that were made about relatively small things within a bigger picture. Twenty years ago, a controversy erupted over a mere term and a concept that now, in hindsight, makes all of the resistance and wasted time marshaled by politicians to stop it, seem rather silly. And yet, it marked a turning point in the region that includes America's mother of national parks.

Could the Diminutive Pika Succeed Where the Polar Bear Failed In Battling Climate Change?

During my six-month internship with the Student Conservation Association, I had the opportunity to collect data for a field study on the habitat effects of climate change. Our crew of four searched for pikas while backpacking along the rocky slopes of California’s Eastern Sierra Nevada. We came to understand several traits of the pika that could make this elusive alpine mammal an important ally in the movement to stop climate change.

NPCA: Health of Everglades National Park Requires a Longer Bridge Along the Tamiami Trail

Once seen as an innovative project for its time, in 1929, Tamiami Trail was built along the northern edge of what was to become Everglades National Park and through Big Cypress National Preserve. It fulfilled the dream to create passage across the Everglades from Tampa to Miami. Today, many people feel much differently about the road that currently impedes the natural flow of water through the historic River of Grass.

Are Yellowstone's Geysers At Risk From BLM's Leasing Proposals?

Yellowstone Thermal Feature; Kurt Repanshek Photo.
The geothermal features in Yellowstone National Park were largely responsible for its designation as the world's first national park in 1872. These features are a global treasure. Nowhere else in the world can you find the array or number of geysers, hot springs, mud pots, and fumaroles found in Yellowstone. More than 75 percent of the world's geysers, including the world's largest are in Yellowstone’s seven major basins.

Panthers, Swamp Buggies, and Nature