Nation's Largest Memorial To WW2 Vets Rededicated At Redwood National And State Parks

A popular attraction in Washington, D.C. is the World War II Memorial, but the nation's largest memorial to World War II veterans is located on the opposite side of the country—in a unit of Redwood National and State Parks. In 1949, five thousand acres of old-growth redwoods were dedicated as the National Tribute Grove to honor those vets, but over the years that designation had been largely forgotten. That's now changed, and the Grove was rededicated in a ceremony late last month.

Redwood National Park Officials Working On Management Plan For Second-Growth Forest

Fifty years ago a section of forest in the Middle Fork of Lost Man Creek in Redwood National Park was logged. Now the National Park Service is drawing up a plan for managing that acreage and seeks your input.

Arrest Made In Burl Poaching Case At Redwood National And State Parks

Law enforcement agents in California have arrested a man in connection with cutting burls off the trunks of redwood trees in Redwood National and State Parks.

"Sea Star Wasting Syndrome" Found At Redwood National And State Parks

A disease that afflicts sea stars has taken root in Pacific waters from Alaska down to California, including portions of Redwood National and State Parks. Biologists say this year's mass mortality tied to the disease is "unprecedented."

Burl Thieves Prompt Nighttime Road Closure At Redwood National And State Parks

National parks face plenty of challenges from crooks determined to steal everything from cacti at Saguaro National Park to ginseng from the Blue Ridge Parkway, but a growing problem at Redwood National and State Parks takes plant thievery to a whole new level. Poaching of burls from redwood trees is destroying the huge trees, and had led to the nighttime closure of a road in the park

Redwood National Park Reopens Tall Trees Access Road

While closed much of last year and early this year due to mandatory budget cuts, the Tall Trees Access Road in Redwood National Park was scheduled to reopen today.

National Park Week Quiz #2 Revealed: The Edited List

We hope you had fun with this fixer-upper.

Near-Total Solar Eclipse Will Cut a Path Across Western National Parks in May

Sunday May 20, 2012 will offer a Celestial Super Bowl—a near-total solar eclipse—and parks in parts of the western U.S. will offer some prime viewing locations. If you want to make travel plans for special eclipse-related activities or purchase equipment for safe viewing, just don't wait too long to do so.

Tree Falls Block Scenic Parkway In Redwood National And State Parks

Someone Paul Buyanesque in stature sure would be handy at Redwood National and State Parks, where the toppling of four massive trees has blocked access to roughly 8 miles of the Newton B. Drury Scenic Parkway in Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park.

NPS Steps In to Keep Three California State Parks Open in 2012

Budget shortfalls are expected to result in the closure of up to 70 of the 278 California state parks, but thanks to help from the National Park Service, three of those sites will get at least a one-year reprieve. Projects in a fourth state site will also receive some additional NPS support.

Barn Swallows At Redwood National and State Parks, the Video

You don't normally associate barn swallows with Redwood National and State Parks, but in fact the birds do show up there, and even like to nest in the park as the following video relates so well.

Watching Whales at Redwood National And State Parks

March can be a great time to spot migrating whales off the coast of Redwood National and State Parks, and to help you spy them rangers will be on hand Mondays, Wednesdays, and Saturdays through the end of March to help you sight the leviathans.

Hawaii and West Coast National Parks Brace for Tsunami Impacts

As Japan reeled from the shock of a magnitude 8.9 earthquake that triggered horrifically destructive tsunamis there, 20 countries prepared to absorb tsunami impacts on their own coasts. Here in America, coastal national parks in Hawaii, Alaska, Washington, Oregon, and northern California are in the bullseye.

Dark Skies in National Parks Make It Easy to Spot the Space Station: Here's How to Look for It

Here's the information you need to see the International Space Station as it arcs across the night sky. A great place to do that is in a national park beyond the reach of urban light pollution and skyline clutter.

Reader Participation Day: California, or Utah, For A National Park Trek?

If you had the option of either traveling to Utah for a swing through its national parks, or to California to sample its national parks, which would you choose?

Creature Feature: The Common Raven is an Uncommonly Intelligent Bird

The common raven is one of the brainiest birds you'll encounter in the national parks, but the same keen intellect that makes this species interesting and amusing also makes it troublesome.

Stewart Udall: A Model of a Conservationist

If you've ever walked through a national park, hiked down a trail, backpacked into wilderness, or paddled a wild and scenic stream, pause and give a minute of thanks for Stewart Udall.

Creature Feature: The Banana Slug is Living Proof that a Slimy Little Gastropod Mollusk Can be Loaded with Charisma

You’d think that a mucus-covered, shell-less, forest-dwelling gastropod whose diet includes animal droppings couldn’t get much love, but the lowly banana slug has acquired a huge fan following. Among other things, it is the star of a community festival, official state mollusk of California, and one of America’s most beloved sports mascots.

National Park Mystery Spot 9 Revealed: A Street Runs Through It

The mystery spot is the building housing the headquarters of Redwood National and State Parks in Crescent City, California. Its unconventional design allows it to straddle a city street, with vehicular traffic passing right through it. This structure was built that way because one of nature’s most awesome forces might send angry torrents of water gushing through instead.

Creature Feature: The Marbled Murrelet is a Flagship Species in the Old-Growth Forest Preservation Movement.

Logging in the old-growth forests of the North Pacific Coast is being blamed for the sharp decline of the marbled murrelet population. More logging restrictions are needed to save the little seabird, and that is causing quite a stir.

At Quake-Struck Redwood National and State Parks, People Wait for the Other Shoe to Drop

The powerful earthquake that struck the northern California coast Saturday didn’t yield a tsunami, kill anybody, or inflict serious property damage. But a strong aftershock is likely, and that can make a person nervous.

Leap Into the Redwoods, Limp Back Out

You can’t walk more than half way into the woods, and sometimes you can’t even get that far. Sometimes you have to swallow your pride and face up to your limitations. Sometimes the experience can be rewarding

Does Ashy Storm Petrel Ruling Imply that Bush-Era “Ignore the Science” Policies are Being Perpetuated at DOI?

Brushing aside scientific evidence that the ashy storm petrel population is in profound decline, the Interior Department has ruled that this seabird doesn’t deserve federal protection. Having expected better from the new administration, disappointed environmentalists think it looks like same-old, same-old at Interior.

The First NPS Area to be Officially Tsunami-Ready? Redwood National and State Parks

map of tsunami's affecting the U.S.
The staff at Redwood National and State Parks has gone the extra mile to prepare for a hazard most visitors don't think about very often: a tsunami. The park is the first NPS area to earn TsunamiReady designation by the National Weather Service. Here's a quick tsunami primer.

Don't Take National Park Landscapes for Granted

How comfortable have we become with national park settings? With the big sweep of granite that frames the Yosemite Valley, with Old Faithful's not-quite-so-faithful demonstrations of steam and hot water, with the fall's colorful deciduous forests of Great Smoky and Shenandoah?

Creature Feature: The Pacific Treefrog

If you've ever heard a frog doing its “ribbet” thing anywhere along the Pacific Coast, it's probably been a Pacific Treefrog. And if you’ve ever seen one of these little critters up close, you know why many consider it one of the most fascinating of all the amphibians.

National Park Quiz 2: Straddlers

Folks had fun with the little quiz we published last week, so we’ve decided to publish a national park system quiz in Traveler every week. Most will be themed. The first one was about centers, and this one is about straddlers. Straddlers are parks that straddle state lines, rivers, mountain ranges, or anything else a park can straddle. There's an extra credit question that's a little off the wall. Answers are at the end. Don’t peek.
The Wild Trees: A Story of Passion and Daring California’s northern coast holds many secrets. The foggy landscape is full of imposing mountains, windswept beaches, and valleys that rival the hollows of the Smokies in terms of narrow inaccessibility. Bigfoot is rumored to live in the area, and somewhere the world’s tallest living being, a coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) named "Hyperion," stands witness to the passage of more than two thousand years.

Poaching Trees from Redwood National Park

Redwood National Park. NPS photo
Illegal poaching of resources from national parks has a long, unsettling history. In Great Smokies, it’s ginseng poaching. In Petrified Forest, it’s thievery of fossilized trees.