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Guest Column| Defending The Science That Explains Climate Change

Adam Markham, director of climate impacts for the Union of Concerned Scientists' Climate and Energy Program and a co-author of the report “National Landmarks at Risk," has written the following rebuttal to Dr. Daniel B. Botkin's column on climate change and his thoughts on what is, and isn't, driving it.
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Instagramming Park Vandal Is Just The Latest To Hit The National Parks And Show-Off Their Crimes

A carefree New Yorker who left acrylic calling cards on the landscape of at least 10 national parks is just the latest vandal to "show-off" her work via Social Media channels. Another scofflaw recently entered a guilty plea to illegal behavior in Yosemite National Park that he, too, showcased via Instragram, a form of self-promotion that provided investigators with the clues they needed to land a conviction.
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Big Bend National Park's "Good Neighbor Day" A Success Despite Remote Location

Finding ways to get students to parks is an ongoing challenge, especially with school budgets for field trips facing cuts in many areas. Those difficulties are even greater in places like Big Bend National Park, since it's many a mile to the nearest town. Thanks to help from partner organizations, a recent "Good Neighbor Day" at Big Bend attracted a nice crowd, and many of those attending were first-time visitors.
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Photo For Social Media Goes Awry And Ends In Rescue At Yosemite National Park

Whether you use social media or still rely on old fashioned snapshots, you've probably seen—and perhaps participated in—a picture of a group doing something slightly goofy during trip to a park. Occasionally, such attempts for an unusual pose go awry, and that was the case recently at Yosemite National Park. The end result was a painful injury and litter carry out for the subject of the photo.
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Photography In The National Parks: Don't Let The Weather Get You Down

In Yellowstone National Park today the wind was blowing cold air, snow and rain into my face as I stood in Lamar Valley and watched as the “new” Lamar Canyon pack, two adults and six pups, made their first public appearance in their valley. The pack visited an old carcass, ran, played and hunted a 7-point bull elk.
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Energy Saving Projects Implemented In National Parks In Greater Washington, D.C., Region

The National Park Service is investing $29 million in 81 individual energy efficiency and water conservation projects at national parks throughout the greater Washington region. This unprecedented commitment to reducing energy use and generating energy from renewable sources is the largest to date among the nine bureaus in the Department of the Interior.
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Guest Column|Climate Is Changing, And Some Parks Are Endangered, But Humans Aren't The Cause

For those of us who love our national parks and are confronted daily with media, politicians, and pundits warning us of a coming global-warming disaster, it’s only natural to ask what that warming will mean for our national parks. This is exactly what the well- known Union of Concerned Scientists discuss in their recent report, National Landmarks at Risk: How Rising Seas, Floods, and Wildfires Are Threatening the UnitedStates’Most Cherished Historic Sites.
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End Of The Road At Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

There's little you can do when your opponent is fresh lava from an erupting volcano, as the folks at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park will readily acknowledge.

Work began Friday (Oct. 24, 2014) in the park on the emergency access route between the park and lower Puna on the historic Chain of Craters Road-Kalapana road alignment. Park staff removed the iconic "Road Closed" sign before the first bulldozer rolled onto the lava-covered roadway.

National Park Service
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150th Sand Creek Massacre Remembrance Event At The Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site

This November 29 marks the 150th year since the Sand Creek Massacre was carried out. On that fateful day, regiments of Colorado (U.S.) Volunteer Cavalry attacked a peaceful Cheyenne and Arapaho village along the Big Sandy Creek. The surprise attack resulted in the deaths of approximately 200 men, women and children. Those who lost their lives will be remembered as part of the commemoration activities planned at the Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site throughout the day.
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Study: Yellowstone National Park's Grizzly Bears Can Adapt Diet To Changing Climate

For years, many conservationists have worried what grizzly bears in the greater Yellowstone ecosystem will eat as changing climate and habitat conditions bring fewer whitebark pine nuts, cutthroat trout and other prime food sources. A recent study offers an answer: almost anything else.
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Video Records Hikers' Reactions To A Bear At Glacier National Park

How do park visitors react when they see a bear in the wild? The answers are all over the proverbial map, depending on the specific situation. Last summer, a visitor used a cell phone camera to record an encounter with a bruin by a group of hikers on a trail near Logan Pass, in Glacier National Park. The short video offers some interesting insights in human, and bear, behavior.
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Requiem For A Glacier: Time To Say Goodbye To Lyell Glacier In Yosemite National Park?

Is it time to start a pool over when the Lyell Glacier in Yosemite National Park is no longer classified as a glacier? Or when it vanishes from the landscape? Those are good questions to ask, as the glacier, the second largest in the Sierra Nevada according to the National Park Service, is continuing to shrink.
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Finding Fall Color In Unexpected Places

Many areas in the National Park System are famous for autumn color, and visitors flock to places like Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Acadia National Park and Rocky Mountain National Park to enjoy the seasonal palette of natural beauty. There are, however, some other parks where fall color can be either a surprise—or a favorite destination for savvy travelers.
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Birding In The National Parks: Where Is It Appropriate To Bird?

I generally don’t have a problem wondering whether or not it’s a good time to bird. If no other duty calls, I’ve got binoculars in hand. I’ve certainly had birding as a top priority on every visit to a national park. Yet, on a dreary day in Pennsylvania last week, I visited a national park and wasn’t sure if wanted to bird, or even if I should consider it.
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Volunteer "Lint Pickers" Help Spruce Up Cave At Carlsbad Caverns National Park

The expression "a little bit goes a long way" can be applied to lots of items, and that's certainly the case when it comes to lint. A small pile of the fluffy stuff may merely be an annoyance at home, but the amount of lint left behind by nearly 400,000 annual visitors to the caves at Carlsbad Caverns National Park can add up to a real problem
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Federal Land Managers Agree To Collaborate On National Wilderness Preservation System

A unified approach to managing the country's wilderness areas has been agreed to by the land management agencies under the Interior and Agriculture departments, with goals of connecting more people to wilderness areas and completing wilderness inventories of lands that might be suitable for inclusion in the wilderness system.
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"Vital Signs" Report Sheds Interesting Light On State Of Grand Teton National Park

How many pairs of bald eagles call Grand Teton National Park home? Do you know how much of the park has been surveyed for archaeological resources? How many glaciers are there in the park, and how are they faring? The answers to those questions are just some of the information you can glean from the park's Vital Signs report for 2013.
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Exploring The Parks: Olympic National Park In Time-Lapse

Though only about 4 minutes long, this video took Will and Jim Pattiz a month to film. They chose Olympic National Park because of it’s incredibly rich diversity - glacial mountain peaks, lush rain forests, alpine meadows, high-altitude lakes, wild rivers, wilderness coast, and teeming wildlife were all the excuse they needed.
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Exploring The Parks: Alibates Flint Quarries National Monument

Archaeologists for years have puzzled over the scale and range of prehistoric activities that created the remarkable flint quarry sites at Alibates, Texas. No doubt some Native Americans, in search of flint, merely picked up exposed chunks or cobbles lying on the ground. Others chiseled boulders directly from the bedrock.
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Higher Fees Coming To Your Favorite National Parks As Officials Search For Cash

As we told you last month, National Park Service Director Jon Jarvis has given his superintendents the OK to increase entrance and other fees in their parks once they've conducted the requisite public outreach and engagement. While many fees are likely to increase by $5 or $10, there could be more creativity into fee collections aimed at generating more money for the parks.
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National Parks Traveler's Essential Park Guide