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Deer Culling At Valley Forge National Historical Park Leads To Better Forest Growth

Dogwood. Black Gum. Sassafras. These are just some of the native species seedlings that have been spotted in the forests of Valley Forge National Historical Park, where a significant reduction in the white-tailed deer herds has allowed these trees to recover from overbrowsing.
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Sea Turtles, History, And Solitude At Canaveral National Seashore

Though Florida is one of the most populated states in the country, there still are places where you can flee humanity in the Sunshine State. Canaveral National Seashore, just north of the Kennedy Space Center, is one of them. Here on the Atlantic Coast the seashore’s beaches draw surfers, swimmers, surfcasters...and turtles...lots of turtles.
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Birding In The National Parks: Birding By Ear

When I was first learning the basic skills of birding, I read a line in Roger Tory Peterson’s famous field guide that almost made me want to give up any aspirations of becoming a good birder. He said something about skilled birders sometimes doing 95 percent of their birding by ear. I was horrified. Here I was, looking through a field guide, imagining all of the pretty birds I would see some day, and Peterson was telling me I’d learn to do 95 percent of it by sound. That’s no fun at all!
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World Ocean Day Programs Scheduled At Cape Hatteras National Seashore

What role do oceans play in our daily lives? How will we rely on them in years to come? These are just some of the questions that are prompted by World Oceans Day, which was first recognized in 2008 and which will be marked this coming Saturday. At Cape Hatteras National Seashore in North Carolina, rangers will be exploring some of those questions.
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Climate Scientists Coming To San Juan Island National Historical Park

San Juan Island National Historical Park offers a bit more than just sightseeing to its visitors this summer. Residents and visitors alike will have an opportunity to learn about the impacts of climate change, how it affects the popular San Juan Islands and other admired national parks through a series of expert speakers.
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Move Over Baseball, National Parks Have Trading Cards, Too

People have been collecting stuff forever. When adults visit national parks, they can collect passport stamps or pamphlets. Children earn Junior Ranger badges, though getting one takes a lot more effort and time than a passport stamp. But there’s something else out there to collect, too, and it looks a lot like baseball trading cards
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Climate Change Poses Risks Of Flooding, Erosion, And Fires To National Park Units And Their Treasures

Treasures of history, culture, and natural beauty contained within the National Park System are increasingly at risk to the perils of climate change, with flooding and wildfire likely to sweep numerous park sites across the country, according to the Union of Concerned Scientists.
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Discover Lighthouses, Sea Kayaking, And Musical Sand At Apostle Islands National Lakeshore

It would be overly simplistic to define Apostle Islands National Lakeshore merely through its watery connection to Lake Superior. True, the lakeshore is comprised of 21 islands that dot the lake, but this 69,372-acre mix of water and land also boasts more lighthouses than any unit of the National Park System.
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Camping In Sequoia National Park, Circa 1912

With the camping season upon us, be sure you pack accordingly. And if you're heading to Sequoia National Park, that means "for marching purposes, the sleeping bag will give better service on account of its compactness. ... For camping out, a mess kit, frying pan, coffee pot, dutch oven, or baking reflector is absolutely necessary." At least that's what the Interior Department recommended in 1912 in its booklet for "Sequoia and General Grant National Parks."
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Wildlife Watching In America's National Parks, A Seasonal Guide

Spotting wildlife in national parks seems intuitive. After all, bears, moose, elk and other wildlife are the calling cards for such parks as Rocky Mountain, Yellowstone, Great Smoky, and so many others. Still, knowing when and where to look can improve your success rate of spotting specific species, and this book can help you accomplish that.
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On The Road Again In The National Park System: From Faneuil Hall To Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park

If you’ve read any history of the Revolutionary War, you know how fickle and lucky we were to be triumphant in our quest for freedom. That’s evident throughout the city of Boston and within the surrounding countryside. Standing in the spots that made history can make the past come to life for the whole family. This trip is about what was, and now is.
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Essential Summer Guide '14: Looking For Ponies At Assateague Island National Seashore

Ponies in the morning mist-they’re a sight to see at Assateague Island National Seashore. You might awake in your dune country campsite to find them gazing right back at you. More likely, you’ll spot them throughout the day roaming free about the 48,000-acre seashore’s beaches and marshlands.
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Coalition Of National Park Service Retirees Reaches 1,000 Members

From its humble beginnings as a group of just three former National Park Service employees speaking out in 2003 against proposed cuts to national park budgets to a major advocacy organization representing a collective 30,000 years of NPS work experience, the Coalition of National Park Service Retirees has added its 1,000th member: former NPS Director Gary Everhardt.
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Exploring The Parks: Return To Shiloh

Over the years the two of us have visited numerous Civil War battlefields, memorials, monuments, and museums (sometimes referred to as “the cannonball circuit”), but none better than Shiloh National Military Park. Shiloh is a world apart from better-known and much busier Gettysburg. It is a superb place to walk, bike, and simply linger during an exploration of the site of this important battle during the early part of America’s Civil War.
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Clark Bunting Comes To National Parks Conservation Association At A Time Of Transition

Transitions can be tricky, and for Clark Bunting his arrival as president and chief executive officer of the National Parks Conservation Association coincided with two pivotal events for the National Park Service: the shuttering of the National Park System last fall, and the challenge of attracting younger, more diverse generations into the parks.
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Millennials In The Parks Are Not An Endangered Species

What is better than packing a car with sleeping bags, tents, new tunes, and good friends? Not much in my opinion! Here in northern Utah I am spoiled with weekend desert adventures that range from meandering around Devils Garden in Arches National Park to canyoneering the narrow ravines of Zion National Park. Exploring the natural wonders, and connecting with friends, is kept alive by the National Park System. The parks make for a great getaway.
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Yellowstone Park Foundation Needs Help Purchasing 1,000 Bear Boxes

Across the National Park System, groups are constantly work to improve the plight of both animals and human visitors. At Yellowstone National Park, one aspect of that effort is to install bear-proof boxes that will keep bears and campers out of each other's way. But as of today, more than 1,000 bear boxes are still needed, and the Yellowstone Park Foundation is trying to raise the money needed to close that gap.
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Olympic National Park Officials Propose Temporary Salvation For Enchanted Valley Chalet

Olympic National Park officials are proposing to move the Enchanted Valley Chalet up to 100 feet from the East Fork of the Quinault River to both protect the historic structure from collapsing and to prevent impacts to the riverbed and its hydrology and fishery.
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National Parks Traveler's Essential Park Guide