Recent comments

  • National Park Mystery Photo 4: What Cabin Is that Yonder?   5 years 21 weeks ago

    Congrats to Mark and Dottie, who, just minutes apart, figured it out.

    The formal name for the building is the "Stonewall Jackson Shrine." As the Park Service explains things:

    The "Stonewall" Jackson Shrine is the plantation office building where General Jackson died. The office was one of several outbuildings on Thomas C. Chandler's 740-acre plantation named "Fairfield." This typical frame structure saw use primarily by the men for recreation as well as for work. Chandler kept records in the office and one of his sons once practiced medicine there, but with three of the Chandler boys away serving in the Confederate Army, the building no longer witnessed its ante-bellum level of activity.

    The office stood bare, except for a few items in storage, when Jackson's ambulance arrived. Although offered the use of the Chandler house, Jackson's doctor and staff officers chose the quiet and private outbuilding as the best place for Jackson to rest after his long ambulance ride. If all went well, the general would soon board a train at Guinea Station and resume his trip to Richmond and the medical expertise available there.

    Today, the office is the only plantation structure remaining. The Chandler house burned at some point after the Civil War, and its shell was dismantled in the early 1900's. Once established as an historic "shrine," the office underwent restorations in the 1920's and the 1960's, and still retains about 45% original fabric. The National Park Service has augmented some of the items used during Jackson's stay with other pieces from the era, along with a few reproductions, to recreate the scene of those tragic last days of his life.

    Jackson's doctors and staff officers both worked and relaxed in this room during the General's stay. Five different physicians examined Jackson, and these men probably discussed their conclusions here over cups of coffee. Jackson's chief surgeon, Dr. Hunter H. McGuire, was the only physician present the entire six days. McGuire had performed the surgery on Jackson in a field hospital near Chancellorsville where he amputated Jackson's twice wounded left arm and removed a ball from the General's right hand.

    Jackson's chaplain, B. Tucker Lacy, had a brother who owned a house near the hospital, and took "Stonewall's" severed limb to his brother's family cemetery for burial. Lacy comforted the pious Jackson, holding devotions with him for the first two days spent at Guinea Station, but the chaplain soon returned to army headquarters. He requested that General Lee send another doctor to relieve the weary McGuire, who tried to provide round-the-clock care. In their conversation about Jackson's condition, Lee told Lacy, "He has lost his left arm, but I have lost my right arm."

  • National Park Mystery Photo 4: What Cabin Is that Yonder?   5 years 21 weeks ago

    Stonewall Jackson memorial?

  • National Park Mystery Photo 4: What Cabin Is that Yonder?   5 years 21 weeks ago

    The house at Guine Station where Stonewall Jackson died ?

  • National Park Mystery Photo 4: What Cabin Is that Yonder?   5 years 21 weeks ago

    Nope.

  • National Park Mystery Photo 4: What Cabin Is that Yonder?   5 years 21 weeks ago

    Kurt...last try! Booker T. Washington National Monument!

  • National Park Mystery Photo 4: What Cabin Is that Yonder?   5 years 21 weeks ago

    Right state, wrong answer.

  • National Park Mystery Photo 4: What Cabin Is that Yonder?   5 years 21 weeks ago

    Patrick Henry birthplace?

  • National Park Mystery Photo 4: What Cabin Is that Yonder?   5 years 21 weeks ago

    Neither one, I'm afraid.

  • National Park Mystery Photo 4: What Cabin Is that Yonder?   5 years 21 weeks ago

    Let's see...It's either Frederick Douglass or Harriet Beecher Stowe birthplace. Kurt, this one is tough!

  • Ride the Rails to Yosemite National Park   5 years 21 weeks ago

    I used Amtrak to get to Yosemite last summer. I thought it was wasteful to rent a car because it would be sitting at a trailhead for nearly 2 weeks. I had no problems with ticketing or planning the trip. The train station in Sacramento is at the end of its light rail line (which unfortunately does not go to the airport). Once in Merced, I took a YARTS bus into the park, and it let me off at the lodge in the Valley.

    On the way back, I took Amtrak to Richmond and rode the BART into San Francisco. I was ticketed on an Amtrak-chartered bus from Oakland to San Fran but chose to take the BART because of a "police incident" in Berkeley. All-in-all, it was a big money- and worry-saver over taking a car into the park, struggling to find parking, and dealing with the other drivers.

  • Ride the Rails to Yosemite National Park   5 years 21 weeks ago

    Thanks for the information Kurt. I learned to love train travel while in the Navy (down in Long Beach before the base was closed). I would travel up and down the coast. Much less crowded than buses (except during commuter hours), more comfortable, and more of a view (especially in the upper view decks).

    National Geographic just had a interesting inside history on Grand Central Station (Inside Grand Central Station) and part of it touched on the change from train travel to our love of cars.

    Executive Director,
    Crater Lake Institute
    www.craterlakeinstitute.com
    Robert Mutch Photography

  • National Park Mystery Photo 4: What Cabin Is that Yonder?   5 years 21 weeks ago

    Not a bad guess, but not the right one. Lee's birthplace was much more substantial. You can see it here.

  • National Park Mystery Photo 4: What Cabin Is that Yonder?   5 years 21 weeks ago

    Is it the birthplace of Robert E. Lee?

  • National Park Mystery Photo 4: What Cabin Is that Yonder?   5 years 21 weeks ago

    Still in full swing every autumn. Always a good time with goodies and folks you only find here in Texas.

  • National Park Mystery Photo 4: What Cabin Is that Yonder?   5 years 21 weeks ago

    Texas Gal, your analytical approach to ID-ing the mystery structure puts me in mind of a project I got involved in during a summer I spent in Parke County, Indiana a long time ago. Under the direction of the eminent cultural geographer John Jakle, a bunch of us University of Illinois graduate students looked at every single rural residence in the county and classified them according to type/style and various characteristics of interest. After a few weeks, we got pretty good at it. If you're familiar with the works of Robert Bastian and Douglas Meyer, you have a pretty fair idea of what we were doing.

    BTW, is the Katy Rice Harvest Festival still being produced every year?

  • Dead Carp at Lake Mohave Make This Memorial Day Memorable for Wrong Reason   5 years 21 weeks ago

    We went fishing on the lake yesterday, May 27 and it was a shock! We live here and hadn't heard anything about this problem. Just riding in our boat to the powerlines, we saw over 100 dead fish floating on top. When we beached our boat on a strip about 40 feet, we found 14 dead carp. When we left..which didn't take long, we sat in our boat and watched as vultures hovered overhead. They landed on the same beach...walked around the dead fish and then flew away without touching the fish. How bad can this be if a vulture says no thanks? The hawks did the same thing.
    I've seen salmon runs and the death of the salmon after spawning..slow rotting bodies swimming until they die. That is exactly what this reminded me of. We stopped at another beach and there were two carp swimming in the shallows. I walked up to them and they didn't move. I could see parts of the fins rotting and white spots on the bodies..that too was rotting flesh.
    What is going on???
    As a resident here, why didn't we know?

  • National Park Mystery Photo 4: What Cabin Is that Yonder?   5 years 21 weeks ago

    Thanks for the note, Texas Gal. I'd give you a hint, but suffice to say that you're in the ballpark.

  • National Park Mystery Photo 4: What Cabin Is that Yonder?   5 years 21 weeks ago

    I once got to take a one-session survey course about colonial architecture at Colonial Williamsburg while on vacation there. Taught me a lot about how to look at buildings. Still want to go back some day but it's a long way from Katy, Texas. I enjoy your writing.

  • National Park Mystery Photo 4: What Cabin Is that Yonder?   5 years 21 weeks ago

    I like your thinking....

  • National Park Mystery Photo 4: What Cabin Is that Yonder?   5 years 21 weeks ago

    Clearly it's colonial in age with 9 over 6 window panes. The shutters would have been standard for the time. My guess is the back extension was not original to the structure but was added before 1825 or so. I still say somewhere in Virginia but there are just too many parks to go through them all.

  • National Park Mystery Photo 4: What Cabin Is that Yonder?   5 years 21 weeks ago

    Ummmm, no.

  • National Park Mystery Photo 4: What Cabin Is that Yonder?   5 years 21 weeks ago

    Ike's home at Gettysburg?

  • National Park Mystery Photo 4: What Cabin Is that Yonder?   5 years 21 weeks ago

    Good guess, but no.

  • National Park Mystery Photo 4: What Cabin Is that Yonder?   5 years 21 weeks ago

    Appomattox

  • House Seals Deal To Allow Wide Range of Firearms into The National Park System   5 years 21 weeks ago

    RickT,

    Before you add your 2 cents there you might want to look at this.

    Attaching this amendment to the credit card bill was a convenience, not brilliant ploy and far from bullet proof. Your reporting of the vote on the credit card bill is correct, but it is way off base on the amendment. The House used a very rarely used option to split the votes on the credit card bill and the firearms amendment.

    House roll call vote: http://clerk.house.gov/evs/2009/index.asp
    #276: Firearms Amendment , 361 For – 64 Against. Passed before the credit card bill! And the numbers!
    #277: Credit Card Bill : 279 For – 147 Against. Lucky, the credit card bill had enough support to pass too![/q]

    See A R Kane's comments on the May 21 for the full text. He writes a lot but he also backs it up. That's a nice change.