Recent comments

  • Reader Participation Day: What Aspect(s) of the National Park System Do You Want to Read More About?   5 years 23 weeks ago

    Bat, since I'm officially unemployed by the NPS at 3:30 today, I guess that means I can answer any questions about working for the NPS truthfully.

    Holly
    http://web.me.com/hollyberry

  • Yellowstone, Grand Teton Officials Searching For Snowmobile, Snowcoach Solution   5 years 23 weeks ago

    I totally agree with Jim Macdonald on this issue !

  • Yellowstone, Grand Teton Officials Searching For Snowmobile, Snowcoach Solution   5 years 23 weeks ago

    When will they limit the number of cars that go in there during the summer? Or how about only allowing hybrid or clean burning cars in there during the summer?

    Come on, the problem is not just what happens 3 months of the year.

  • Reader Participation Day: What Aspect(s) of the National Park System Do You Want to Read More About?   5 years 23 weeks ago

    I'm a huge fan of the parks and I have learned so much from your articles. It's a selfless public service you do, please accept my thanks! I'm glad you welcome comments; sometimes I get the sense of being out of my depth, but have enjoyed participating when I have something relevant/intelligent to say. I check in with you guys at least every other day to read the latest & greatest, good and bad. I enjoy the quizzes, even though I've failed nearly all of them. (Shhh. Don't tell Prof. Bob) If I had a request, I'd like to hear more about what working in the parks is like. Is a job in the NPS worth pursuing? Bet that would generate some comments.

  • Traveler's Gear Box: When You Need To Stop Bleeding Fast....   5 years 23 weeks ago

    Asoul--

    If your patient is conscious, it is always good to ask him/her to what he/she might be allergic. Most people have a fairly good idea about this. I never even give anyone an aspirin or a excedrin without asking. Most of the products that Kurt mentions are safe for almost anyone. But the operative word is "almost".

    Rick

    Rick Smith

  • Traveler's Gear Box: When You Need To Stop Bleeding Fast....   5 years 23 weeks ago

    Asoul, I'm not an expert, and this isn't medical advice, but the manufacturer says the product utilizes a "chemically inert" material, so I'm not sure what allergic reaction might be possible.

    As for where you can find these and other Adventure Medical products: REI, Cabella's, Dick's, and Eastern Mountain Sports are among the main outlets.

  • Mammoth Cave National Park Follows Ken Burns' Documentary With Its Own Film   5 years 23 weeks ago

    I hope that maybe other PBS affiliates pick this film up for use in other markets. I would love to see it!

    On a similar note (but not with the intent of digressing this post of course), there was also a high-definition film shot in 2006 of the Gateway Arch that explores its purpose and meaning. See website at http://www.archdocumentary.com/
    This film is incredibly excellent and really well done. The only thing is, JNEM has not done anything with it. I believe the producers sought to provide it as a gift to the park.

  • Reader Participation Day: What Aspect(s) of the National Park System Do You Want to Read More About?   5 years 23 weeks ago

    I live in metro NY and this is my favorite blog. It is the one cyber-stop I make each day that lifts my spirits and reminds me about all that is wonderous in the United States.

    I love hearing about the wildlife. And maybe I'm part sadist but that story about the European visitor on the payphone in Yellowstone getting some air thanks to a Bison was hilarious. I'm sure the Rangers out there have some funny stories to share.

    Why not do stories about the unusual Parks (i.e. I bet most people don't know there's a NPS facility on Wall St where Obama spoke from last week).

    I especially like hearing about the parks in the Rockies. And I am always interested in stories about people having accidents or getting lost (and hopefully found). But I think that comes from having lived in the Colorado wildnerness for years and I know how easy it is for something to go wrong in the backcountry. There's valuable lessons in each of these stories.

    But I also want to stay current on the NPS and Dept of the Interior politics. How is Salazar doing so far?

    Most of all thank you for doing such a great job! I look forward to seeing your daily headline feed on myYahoo each morning.

  • Reader Participation Day: What Aspect(s) of the National Park System Do You Want to Read More About?   5 years 23 weeks ago

    Digging out little known facts about our national parks is a Traveler specialty, Jolene. I think you'll find a lot to like along those lines if you browse through "back issues." Do that and let us know what you think.

  • Reader Participation Day: What Aspect(s) of the National Park System Do You Want to Read More About?   5 years 23 weeks ago

    Maybe a section on "little known facts" about our great parks.
    Also discussions/infomration on great places for retired travelers to set down for a few months and volunteer. I think DG hit a good spot in looking at the strengths and weaknesses of the various parks. There are those of us out here who are retired or, like me, soon to retire, who would gladly give our right arm to work in our beloved parks and have a positive impact. JKP

  • Reader Participation Day: What Aspect(s) of the National Park System Do You Want to Read More About?   5 years 23 weeks ago

    I'd like to hear from readers about Fourth of July memories in the national parks. One year at the Grand Canyon, North Rim Lodge, the staff organized a parade and water gun fight, since fireworks were not allowed. We tourists could participate in the wet zone or stay in the dry zone. Our son had a blast, as did we, watching him!

    Or perhaps it could be framed as "extras" that staffs at the parks have done. In addition to the above example, during a visit to Many Glacier Lodge in Glacier National Park, we once discovered a delightful musical of "golden oldies" put on by the young summer staff members. It was enthusiastic, well-done, and enjoyed by all generations.

  • National Park Mystery Spot 3: Do the Math   5 years 23 weeks ago

    WOOHOO! I have to admit I always hated multiple choice tests because I always second guessed myself. I bet my professors got sick of hearing it as well!

    Ranger Holly
    http://web.me.com/hollyberry

  • National Park Mystery Spot 3: Do the Math   5 years 23 weeks ago

    RangerLady, during my 33 years in harness at the University of South Carolina I heard this same lament from hundreds of students who took my exams. My heart was eventually hardened and I learned to turn a deaf ear. But now advancing age has mellowed me a bit, so what the hell: Go ahead and give yourself full credit for this quiz. You're welcome.

  • Reader Participation Day: What Aspect(s) of the National Park System Do You Want to Read More About?   5 years 23 weeks ago

    More of all of the above, please!

    I love the traveler's checklists. Like the one for Acadia, where I could add a few things I'd done there that Kurt hadn't mentioned. By the time the article's been up for a week, the readers have expanded it by hundreds of percent and you have a pretty thorough treatment of the stuff to do at a given place.

    I think more travelogue-type articles on specific places and activities would be cool. Rafting the Rio Grande in Big Bend, bird watching on Hurricane Ridge in Olympic, kayaking around Cumberland Island...

    You could get some in-depth articles on somewhat obscure activities that reveal the spirit of some of these places.

  • Reader Participation Day: What Aspect(s) of the National Park System Do You Want to Read More About?   5 years 23 weeks ago

    Thanks, Steve. We're always glad to get suggestions for Reader Participation topics. If you've got more ideas, be sure to send 'em along and we'll see what we can do with them.

    DG, you need to dig back through "back issues" of Traveler (of which there are several years worth -- see Browse Content by Date). If you do that you'll see that we're already doing many of the things you've suggested. Reader comments provide much of the "inside view" you'd like to see, so don't ignore the comments following articles. Some of the more in-depth reporting you'd like to see is simply not feasible at the present time, given our limited resources, but is out there on the horizon.

    Tom, are you sure you didn't mean more lightweight material? Because if that's what you want, we can sure provide it! In a more serious vein, we here at Traveler do try to balance the serious stuff with lighter fair. At least, Jim and I do. As you may have noticed, Kurt is as serious as a heart attack.

    Tomp, I will admit this much: If there are no lagers available, it's OK to drink ale. Newcastle Brown Ale, if they have it. As for the final design of the South Carolina Department of Transportation (SCDOT) Hwy 601 bridge/causeway project on the Congaree River floodplain, well, your guess is as good as mine. SCDOT seems bent on doing the job on the cheap (surprise, surprise!), which essentially means replacing the river bridge and rebuilding the existing floodplain causeway (which in many ways acts like a dam). Congaree National Park wants a project that has nice scenic turnouts, park access spurs, and a design that will permit water (and wildlife) to flow under the lengthy structure with a minimum of interference.

    Anon, we can only include articles and thought pieces about poets, artists, and writers once in a while because, quite frankly, reader interest in these themes is very limited. Personally, I wish that weren't so, but there it is.

  • Reader Participation Day: What Aspect(s) of the National Park System Do You Want to Read More About?   5 years 23 weeks ago

    Anon, here at Traveler we just don''t have the resources to track a lot of different events for our readers. But you can track the events schedule for particular parks yourself without too much difficulty. Grand Canyon National Park is an example of a park with readily accessible information about events scheduled weeks of months from now. To see for yourself, go to www.nps.gov/grca click on Plan Your Visit, then click on Things to Do, then click on Schedule of Events ("Calendar of Events" is yet another listing). Note that you can specify inclusive dates well in the future. Smaller parks with less sophisticated websites can still provide the info you want; you just have to dig a little harder for it -- generally by beginning with Things to Do. If you phone your "local" (closest) national parks, you may find that you can receive, via snailmail or e-mail, newsletters or other publications that provide schedules of coming events. Good luck, and have fun.

  • National Park Mystery Spot 3: Do the Math   5 years 23 weeks ago

    Darn! I was right but I second guessed myself! Does thinking the right answer count?

    Ranger Holly
    http://web.me.com/hollyberry

  • The Pacific Northwest Trail Will Establish Important Linkages   5 years 23 weeks ago

    I'm with you Kurt. Hiking the AT is on my bucket list, but like many I simply can't afford to take 6 months off of work. I'd return to find my car towed away and bill collectors knocking on my door. PLus no one will babysit my evil cat for that amount of time. Although I'm sorry that people are losing jobs, it's nice that the trails are there so people can get back to the simpler things.

    Ranger Holly
    http://web.me.com/hollyberry

  • Dinosaur National Monument Superintendent Favors Law Enforcement, Maintenance, Interpretation Over Paleontology   5 years 23 weeks ago

    Paleontologists typically make between $20,000, with a college degree and $50,000 dollars a year with a PhD. You will need to take 4 years of college majoring either in Geology or Biology, 2 year Masters of Science Degree in either subject, and 4 to 5 years for a Doctoral degree. A Post-doctorate is highly recommended. Paleontologists typically work either for non-profit museums or universities (teaching anatomy or geology), but a growing number of paleontologists work for various companies conducting fossil surveys and savage for industry compliance. Currently there are more opportunities for paleontologists in China and Europe so you might pick up a foreign language. If you interested in science, paleontology is clearly worth all the effort and heart-ache. Clearly the most fascinating subject science has to offer is paleontology, the study of ancient life across the incredibly long history of our amazing planet. Money, well who cares, as long as you are doing what you love.

  • The Pacific Northwest Trail Will Establish Important Linkages   5 years 23 weeks ago

    For what it's worth --thread drift, for sure -- there was a story the other day in the Wall Street Journal about the sour economy spurring an increase in the number of AT through-hikers.

    "I wouldn't do this if I was employed," Dan Kearns, a 32-year-old construction worker who decided to hike the nearly 2,200-mile AT end-to-end, told the Journal. "I couldn't find any work, so I just decided to take a walk."

    According to the article, a typical year sees about 1,000 through-hikers leaving Georgia each spring on the AT. This year the number was a bit closer to 1,400, with "hundreds more following behind through early summer."

    A through-hike on the AT was something I thought about often growing up in New Jersey, but I never found the time to do it. These days I wish I had made the time. Of course, no one is wishing unemployment on folks to force them to get out and experience nature. But as George points out above, even the long-distance trails harbor gems for day hikers to experience. I second his comment that the "A.T. inspires all of us," and hope the PNT does the same for those on the West Coast.

    These trails, and all the shorter trails that are sprinkled throughout the country, play a vital role in the country and should be recognized for that role. They help connect us to nature, they provide a portal to solitude and reflection, and they can help ease the troubles on our minds.

  • National Park Mystery Spot 3: Do the Math   5 years 23 weeks ago

    Bingo! Nice going, Michelle. The mystery spot is indeed Mt. McKinley. Watch for a full explanation of the clues in tomorrow's edition of Traveler.

  • National Park Mystery Spot 3: Do the Math   5 years 23 weeks ago

    Nope, not Gettysburg.

  • National Park Mystery Spot 3: Do the Math   5 years 23 weeks ago

    Mt. McKinley

  • National Park Mystery Spot 3: Do the Math   5 years 23 weeks ago

    How about Gettysburg?

  • Is Glacier National Park At Threat From Proposed Mining Operations in British Columbia?   5 years 23 weeks ago

    Here we are again facing selfish ignorance, greed, power, money with the ability to ruin precious things for the rest of us. Petitions, letter writing, and protests feel like such feeble attempts to save such a grand treasure - it seems so unreal that upstream mining could even be proposed. Prayers go out for those who are there to argue for the safety of a wild majestic beauty that should never be challenged by this sort of rape.