Recent comments

  • Bobcats Attack Two at Death Valley National Park   6 years 3 weeks ago

    We were present at the attack, witnessed it, and can report that this woman was not feeding any bobcat nor did she have any food. My wife and I had been swimming at around dusk. As we got out of the water a nice couple from California asked us to join them at the fireplace where they had a roaring fire going. We pulled up chairs and the four of us were facing the fire, talking, not eating or drinking, no food or drink present.

    At this point the gentleman looks over my wife's shoulder, and says "Looks like a kitty". My wife turns to face a bobcat in the act of jumping onto her shoulder and neck from behind. As she turns the bobcat retreats, runs out of the pool area, and around the back of the fireplace. Realizing what happened, I happened to have a small flashlight, and the gentleman and I walked over to where the pool ends and desert begins, in the area behind the fireplace. I shined the light and saw nothing.

    Then, to a chorus of screaming, we ran back to the fireplace to see the bobcat on the back of his wife's neck. She screamed, chased it away, and I grabbed a chair to keep it away from the four of us. We examined her wounds, saw they were open and bleeding, and I ran over to the wall phone to call for help.

    No one came down to the pool. I shined the light out into the desert and the bobcat was about 15 feet out looking toward the pool. We retreated up to the inn, me bringing up the rear with my chair shield.

    About 10 minutes later or so the rangers arrived and transported the lady to the hospital in Pahrump for the start of rabies shots.

    We later learned that someone on the inn kitchen staff had been feeding bobcats, returned to Europe after her job was up, leaving behind a few hungry, habituated bobcats.

    Overall comment....this was scary. We are regular DV hikers, have been to many remote locations including Alaska with Grissly habitat, but have not ever experienced the complete lack of fear on the part of a predator. If there is a lesson to be learned, beyond of course never ever ever feed wildlife, it is that DV is theirs, not ours and be always cognizant of that. In retrospect I do not believe that we did anything at all wrong. This was a case of an animal that got the wrong idea about humans.

  • Is Bush Administration Moving to Shuck Some Congressional Oversight on Public Lands Management?   6 years 3 weeks ago

    Osama Binladan couldnt have done a better job of raping our natuural resourceses our economy and bringing this country to its knees. I hope the Bush administration is proud.

  • Take the Interstate to One of the Largest Units in the National Park System   6 years 3 weeks ago

    Take spare gas if you want to explore the preserve.-- we did and it is a fantastic area. We found no gas between I 40 and I 15 and there is plenty of trails to use it on.

  • Pruning the Parks: Millerton Lake Recreation Area, 1945-1957   6 years 3 weeks ago

    Your article was very informative. I usually come to California during the summer and love spending my time at public parks. Your article really gave me a perspective of how beautiful Millerton Lake State Recreation is. I also have a website that focuses on public parks. Hope you have the time to check the site out. You can go here to go to my website.

  • Thanks to the California Desert Protection Act, Death Valley National Park is the Biggest Park in the Coterminous U.S.   6 years 4 weeks ago

    It's interesting that The California Desert Protection Act of 1994 not only resulted in Death Valley becoming the largest NPS unit in the coterminous states, it also added the 3rd largest unit in Mohave National Preserve. Reading about the long political battle to get that act passed made me appreciate these two areas even more.

    My first visit to Death Valley years ago - a camping trip on a February weekend - coincided with rain in the low country and snow on the peaks. It was interesting to see the park under those conditions.

  • Take the Interstate to One of the Largest Units in the National Park System   6 years 4 weeks ago

    Fred - Thanks for the comment! Sounds like you're an "alumni" of Nellis AFB.

    I spend several years at Lake Mead, so have some appreciation for that part of the country as well - at least the portions away from Las Vegas :-)

  • My Mentor   6 years 4 weeks ago

    I worked with Gary, back in 1976, at Scotty's Castle in Death Valley.
    Sorry, to hear about his death.
    P.S. If you think the N.P.S. is bad try working for B.L.M.

  • Traveler's View: Concealed Weapons Have No Place In Our National Park System   6 years 4 weeks ago

    Gun haters are so intolerant.

  • Take the Interstate to One of the Largest Units in the National Park System   6 years 4 weeks ago

    I used to be stationed near here when I was in the Air Force. This is an incredibly beautiful landscape. It is a very worthy addition to your travel plans!

  • Is Bush Administration Moving to Shuck Some Congressional Oversight on Public Lands Management?   6 years 4 weeks ago

    Bob, very cleverly put! But, my strong discontent for the man (too put it mildly) and his unconscionable disregard for the protection of our natural resources and heritage runs high. Maybe he isn't sipping but smoking foreign tobacco of some sort...it sure shows with his bizarre behavior over the past eight years.

  • Is Bush Administration Moving to Shuck Some Congressional Oversight on Public Lands Management?   6 years 4 weeks ago

    As a reformed alcoholic, George W. Bush no longer consumes alcoholic beverages. Thus, while gazing out over the smoking ruins of his failed presidency may make him melancholy or vindictive or whatever, he doesn't laugh over, cry over, or do anything else with beer -- at least nothing stronger than the O'Douls (<0.5% ABV) depicted in some scenes of "W."

  • Is Bush Administration Moving to Shuck Some Congressional Oversight on Public Lands Management?   6 years 4 weeks ago

    I'm not surprised by Bush's political chicanery to remove public lands (within national parks boundaries) for more rape, greed and pillage. What precious resources we have left must not be exploited by this careless and reckless administration. This last ditch efforts by the Bush administration is another example and tactic to continue with it's ruination policies without a care or concern for it's destructive practices to the environment. Watch this administration burn bridges to cover it's tracks of dirty misdeeds before leaving office. Bush is probably laughing in his beer knowing and marveling at his destructive empire...which is soon to crumple.

  • Rockefeller Family Turns Over More than 1,100 Acres to Grand Teton National Park   6 years 4 weeks ago

    Beamis and I often have very fundamental disagreements in the past; however, I can't agree more with the sentiment that we need to be consistent in our ethics. I think the discussion on the other thread that I linked to says quite well why I think so. Conservation at all costs is not actually pragmatic at all. And, if we wonder why there is so much resistance in the West to environmentalism, looking at the history of misdeeds tells us why we are in some of the unreasonable fights we are in now.

    Think of everything going on in Grand Teton and the immediate area - with the National Elk Refuge, with cattle grazing (ironically alongside bison with brucellosis), with CWD coming soon, and think of why those problems seem unsolvable. There's a lot of history of mistrust.

    In any event, for the most part, Jackson Hole as it is now is mostly a happy accident, not a process of establishment I can celebrate. And, again, if anyone can actually convince me that I'm wrong to link ends and means so tightly, I'll be happy to stand corrected.

    Jim Macdonald
    The Magic of Yellowstone
    Yellowstone Newspaper
    Jim's Eclectic World

  • Is Bush Administration Moving to Shuck Some Congressional Oversight on Public Lands Management?   6 years 4 weeks ago

    As far as federal lands go anything that is a energy or mineral resource is all being fast tracked (stolen) by administrative directives. The Bush Texas model, now the Colorado resource raid, and now what is left is now being handed away on a silver platter. Heck even the rents where recently reduce by 20%. Given that the housing market has no more liquidity Bush and his Spoiled System cronies are going for what is left.,.. OUR natural resources! That is why the Endangered Species Act was eviscerated over the summer by administrative directive. There has been very little time or no time for public given at all for public comments. I call it Corporate Feudalism.

  • How About Some Economic Stimulus for the National Park System?   6 years 4 weeks ago

    Funding for projects such as the mass transit systems that have been mentioned would be a great thing. However, let's not be entirely negative about funding badly needed repairs for existing roads. While I certainly agree that we should have concerns about new roads in parks, keeping existing roads in safe condition doesn't necessarily mean increased vehicle use - and those same roads can just as easily be used for mass transit system as for private vehicles. Work which is long overdue for the Going-to-the-Sun Road in Glacier is a good example. That project is underway, but it sounds like funds to complete all of the necessary work are not available.

    Letting roads revert to gravel, as has been suggested, simply increases maintenance costs over the long run, and anyone who has spent much time driving on unpaved roads might question if all the dust put in the air from traffic on those roads - not to mention the mud and siltation problems for adjacent waterways - is a great trade-off to pavement.

    While I understand the sentiments against roads in parks, the reality is that without continued reasonable access, visitation to and public support for parks would drop off to the point that they would no longer be politically sustainable. I'm concerned that parks are already facing an increasingly serious fight for survival as competition for scarce dollars increases and the nation's population becomes increasingly disconnected from the natural world. Alienating an already dwindling support base by some of the measures suggested would not seem to be beneficial in that environment.

  • How About Some Economic Stimulus for the National Park System?   6 years 4 weeks ago

    It certainly wouldn't hurt if some of that money were put into a mass transit system for the South Rim of the Grand Canyon....the one Congress has looked into in the past only to conclude it's too expensive.

    It is way past time that some logic be applied to economic development projects. Mass transit systems in the parks are just one example of wise-spending, in my opinion. They get cars off the roads, negate the need for more parking lots and constantly repaving parking lots, and carry environmental dividends, regardless of whether one believes in anthropogenic global warming.

  • Rockefeller Family Turns Over More than 1,100 Acres to Grand Teton National Park   6 years 4 weeks ago

    Lepanto and Rick Smith----you label me as over the top and "great entertainment value" and then tell me I'm overly pessimistic (because it must be hard for me to get up in the morning with such a dismal view of my imperial masters in DC) yet have nothing beyond personal attacks to offer in rebuttal to my observations.

    All I can say is I hope your guy wins and you'll be able to force everyone else to bend to the will of the new more "progressive" majority.

    As for Grand Teton N.P. I've read the history and know quite well that it was the same members of the power elite, that most readers of this site love to regularly bash, in this case a baron of BIG OIL, who used his incredible wealth and connections to swindle and cheat small landowners out of their land, just as was done in Shenandoah, the Great Smokies and other so called "national treasures" for the "common good".

    It seems that you have no quarrel with practices and ethics you would otherwise condemn as long as they are used for causes and purposes you agree with and support. This is the very essence of mob rule.

    Long live democracy!

    Long live the oligarchy!

  • Rockefeller Family Turns Over More than 1,100 Acres to Grand Teton National Park   6 years 4 weeks ago

    Last time I checked, this article was about Grand Teton, not the economic policy....

  • Rockefeller Family Turns Over More than 1,100 Acres to Grand Teton National Park   6 years 4 weeks ago

    I find Beamis to be very optimistic, particularly when he resists giving into the fear propaganda surrounding global warming and other world environmental "crises". Beamis is optimistic that change is around the corner. His assessment of the two candidates isn't pessimistic; it's accurate. Socialism is "state or collective ownership and administration of the means of production and distribution of goods, and the creation of an egalitarian society". Certainly both candidates, having voted to nationalize our banking industry, are somewhat socialistic. And please review the economics of fascism before you dismiss Beamis. You'll find "the nationalization of all businesses which have been formed into corporations" among other descriptors that I find particularly apt with both candidates.

    Look at what happened in Italy during the Great Depression and World War II:

    In 1929, Italy was hit hard by the Great Depression. The Italian economy, having just emerged from a period of monetary stabilization, was not ready for this shock. Prices fell and production slowed. Unemployment rose from 300,787 in 1929 to 1,018,953 in 1933. Trying to handle the crisis, the Fascist government nationalized the holdings of large banks which had accrued significant industrial securities. The government also issued new securities to provide a source of credit for the banks and began enlisting the help of various cartels (consorzi) that had been created by Italian business leaders since 1922. The government offered recognition and support to these organizations in exchange for promises that they would manipulate prices in accordance with government priorities. A number of mixed entities were formed, called instituti or enti nazionali, whose purpose it was to bring together representatives of the government and of the major businesses. These representatives discussed economic policy and manipulated prices and wages so as to satisfy both the wishes of the government and the wishes of business. The government considered this arrangement to be a success, and Italian Fascists soon began to pride themselves on this outcome, saying they had survived the Great Depression without infringing on private property.

    Sound familiar?

  • Rockefeller Family Turns Over More than 1,100 Acres to Grand Teton National Park   6 years 4 weeks ago

    Bravo Mr Mcdonald you have once again put your anarchy stamp on yet another story here at Traveler. This discussion centers on the thoughtful and forward thinking of the Rockefellers who have done some amazing things in this country for national parks including making Acadia National Park even possible, since most of the park is their land--no doubt swindled as you might say from misinformed and bullied landowners who had no idea what their oceanside land was worth and got pillaged in the sale. Perhaps th efamily did nothing more than suggest that they would do nothing to hurt the land and indeed protect it from future generations who might want to profit from it--but I digress. You've mananged to once again spark a political debate within an issue that has nothing to do with poltics but conservation. I'm not sure anarchists and conservation go together....so what is your point???? I agree with the grounded folk here in this thread...praise any conservation effort made by any group, because like it or not it's a step in a positive direction. Even if it's not a popular one, it is a step that encourages many more steps. I think you should try your optimist suit on...it might be a much better fit.

  • How About Some Economic Stimulus for the National Park System?   6 years 4 weeks ago

    road, road, roads, Road, road, roads, roads, roads, road, Road

    Wow! Ten uses of the word "road" in one article! Let's just rename the agency the National Parkway Service!

    $440,000,000 (almost half a BILLION dollars) in road construction projects! Think of all the CO2 that construction will put into the air! Think of all the CO2 belched by vehicles driving on those roads. In one breath, global warming is a "crisis"; in another breath, let's pave roads!

    Or let the roads go back to gravel and allocate that fiat money--hot off the presses--to education and resource protection. The NPS doesn't need more Monopoly money; it needs to reprioritize with an emphasis on the cheaper "preservation" over wasteful "enjoyment".

  • Rockefeller Family Turns Over More than 1,100 Acres to Grand Teton National Park   6 years 4 weeks ago

    Sorry, Bemis, but I don't buy your bleak assessment of the world or the US. Nor do I agree with your characterization of the two candidates as a socialist and a fascist. Your unremitting pessimism is hard to read. For you, apparently, the glass is neither half full nor half empty; it's empty. It must be hard to get up every morning.

    Rick Smith

  • Rockefeller Family Turns Over More than 1,100 Acres to Grand Teton National Park   6 years 4 weeks ago


    Jeepers, Beamis, there's not much grey area in your conception of the world, is there? So, our immorality exceeds all other's, and this comic book version of history you would install in place of any kind of real understanding of how things are, and how they work?

    Beamis, i do try to give your stuff the benefit of the doubt. Sure, nothing exceeds like excess. It can have great entertainment value. But this rant in response to the preservation of the Grand Tetons? This gives a new meaning to 'over the top.'

    It's time, Beamis: Get The Hook.

  • How About Some Economic Stimulus for the National Park System?   6 years 4 weeks ago

    d-2

    I agree

  • Updated: Bush Administration: "A Legacy of Failure for Our Public Lands," Claims Congressman Grijalva   6 years 4 weeks ago

    How depressing - we can only hope that the next president makes a concerted effort to reverse some of these dastardly assaults on our public lands.