Recent comments

  • Op-Ed| The National Park Service Could Learn A Few Things From Its African Colleagues   1 week 3 hours ago

    T'would be completely futile, friend EC. Once again you want to play word games rather than understand the point that is being made.

  • Op-Ed| The National Park Service Could Learn A Few Things From Its African Colleagues   1 week 4 hours ago

    EC completely fails to see any irony in his comment above at 9:38 p.m.

    You are right Lee, I fail to see the irony. Perhaps you could explain it again. Your last attempt made absolutely no sense. Please start by explaing how I want to Ethiopianize parks.

  • Op-Ed| The National Park Service Could Learn A Few Things From Its African Colleagues   1 week 4 hours ago

    the joy of the profit-motive crowd.

    No, the joy of the profit motive crowd is creation. People don't get into the top 1% by spending all their money.

    Take a look at the mountains in the east that used to have mountaintops.

    Could you identify those mountains and explain how we are worse off for them not having "tops".

  • Nááts’ihch’oh National Park Reserve Becomes Canada's 44th National Park   1 week 4 hours ago

    Can anyone provide a phonetic pronounciation of this name?

  • Op-Ed| The National Park Service Could Learn A Few Things From Its African Colleagues   1 week 4 hours ago

    then I'm not sure who else W could be referring to.

    Europeans, Asians, South Americans, Australians .........

    The entrance fee for Tangarine is $22.

    Which is more than 2% of what the average Tansanian earns in a year. 2% of the average US income would put the entrance fee over $1,000. How many average Americans would visit a park with that fee?

    Once again you want to play word games rather than understand the point that is being made. The point is the average African can't afford to go to these parks. They are visited by the relatively rich. Some of which may be African but a major portion, if not vast majority are foreign visitors, American and otherwise, like yourself that are massively wealthy in comparison to the indigenous population.

  • Op-Ed| The National Park Service Could Learn A Few Things From Its African Colleagues   1 week 4 hours ago

    This is a hoot. EC completely fails to see any irony in his comment above at 9:38 p.m.

    He's exactly right, though. Even though he apparently can't understand the need for us to work hard to prevent our parks and natural resources from becoming Ethiopianized.

    And is it possible that those "snobs" who visit these African parks just might be the beginning of something that might at some time in the future, help lift the African people who live nearby out of poverty?

    Sort of the same way that Canyonlands and Arches have helped lift the natives of Moab, Utah out of poverty?

  • Op-Ed| The National Park Service Could Learn A Few Things From Its African Colleagues   1 week 12 hours ago

    The opposite of conservation is consumption - the joy of the profit-motive crowd.

    Problem is, once something is consumed, it's gone. Take a look at the mountains in the east that used to have mountaintops.

  • National Parks Will Be Focus Of 2016 Rose Bowl Parade   1 week 12 hours ago

    San Gabriel Mountains NM will be overlooked because it's not an NPS area; it's managed by the US Forest Service. However, Santa Monica Mountains NRA is in the park system. I hope that, however much the parks are celebrated in the parade, historic sites and monuments are not forgotten.

  • Nááts’ihch’oh National Park Reserve Becomes Canada's 44th National Park   1 week 13 hours ago

    This is not a new national park, nor is it the 44th national park in the system, despite language used in the news release. It's a National Park Reserve, the eighth one in the country. There are still 37 national parks, and that number has not changed with this announcement. Nááts’ihch’oh will be administered LIKE a national park under the National Parks Act, but it won't actually be a national park until Native American land claims are settled. Its next-door neighbor, Nahanni, has been a National Park Reserve for 37 years, since it was created in 1978. Clearly things can take their sweet time if all the right players are not in place, and it's not a political priority.

    What's concerning is that Parks Canada (and perhaps the Dept. of the Environment) appears to so badly want to count this as a park, that it's doing so right now. The problem is that, if such a landscape is celebrated as if it's a park already, there's little impetus to actually get it to that stage, and it causes confusion in the public mind. The government looks as if it's accomplished something big, even when it's really only gotten to the threshhold of creating a park.

    Moreover, in the case of Nááts’ihch’oh, compromises were made in favor of industry. Of three boundary options for the park reserve that came from a working group, the smallest area was selected by the government, while the larger areas were preferred by Natives and local stakeholders. This choice omitted what the Cdn. Parks & Wilderness Society (CPAWS) calls the most critical areas for protection of two herds of woodland caribou (calving and breeding grounds), grizzly bears, Dall’s sheep and mountain goats. It leaves large swaths open to mining and energy extraction, preserving 70 percent of overall mineral potential by leaving it outside the new park reserve. Critics also say this leaves too much of the upper watershed of the South Nahanni River unprotected.

  • Op-Ed| The National Park Service Could Learn A Few Things From Its African Colleagues   1 week 14 hours ago

    Not a word in that post about American's going to African parks.

    Well, since the "rich elites" going to Africa obviously can't already be living in Africa, and the only others mentioned are Americans, then I'm not sure who else W could be referring to.

    The entrance fee for Tangarine is $22. I was in Mole NP and, like I said, most people there were (West) African.

    Is that what you want for our National Parks?

    Are you asking me if I want America's National Parks to be more expensive?

  • Op-Ed| The National Park Service Could Learn A Few Things From Its African Colleagues   1 week 14 hours ago

    @ 6:59.

    Not a word in that post about American's going to African parks.

    What does that have to do with your claim that Africans can't afford to go to African NPs? ?

    The average Tanzanian income is less than $1,000 a year. The park fees alone are 50-100 per day. Accomodations are $400 a night and up. Add to that the guide fee. The average Tanzanian does not go to the Serengeti. Is that what you want for our National Parks?

  • Op-Ed| The National Park Service Could Learn A Few Things From Its African Colleagues   1 week 14 hours ago

    No it wasn't. Show me where he said anything about Americans going to Africa.

    @ 6:59.

    What percentage of the 1 million visitors to Serengeti and Ngorongoro are native to the host country?

    Beats me. What does that have to do with your claim that Africans can't afford to go to African NPs?

    Yet again, how am I snob? Or is there no basis for the name-calling?

  • Op-Ed| The National Park Service Could Learn A Few Things From Its African Colleagues   1 week 14 hours ago

    No, the comparison was among Americans who could or couldn't afford to go there.

    No it wasn't. Show me where he said anything about Americans going to Africa.

    When I was there, it was full of Africans.

    Ok. What percentage of the 1 million visitors to Serengeti and Ngorongoro are native to the host country?

  • Op-Ed| The National Park Service Could Learn A Few Things From Its African Colleagues   1 week 14 hours ago

    How is a comparison to Africans relevant to my comment?)

    Because we were comparing an African park to an American park. The fact you could afford to go there when the vast majority of Africans can't, is the point. He wasn't refering to "Americans that can go there" he was making the point that the African Park was a play ground for the (relatively) rich, not a park for the Africans - or the African animals for that matter.

  • Op-Ed| The National Park Service Could Learn A Few Things From Its African Colleagues   1 week 14 hours ago

    Because we were comparing an African park to an American park.

    No, the comparison was among Americans who could or couldn't afford to go there.

    The fact you could afford to go there when the vast majority of Africans can't, is the point

    How do you know Africans can't afford to go to an African national park? When I was there, it was full of Africans.

    And again, how am I a snob?

  • Op-Ed| The National Park Service Could Learn A Few Things From Its African Colleagues   1 week 15 hours ago

    I'm not a "rich elite snob."

    But you are far richer than the average African. How much did you spend for your visit? Probably more than the average life earnings of an African. You are an "elite snob" relative to the vast majority of those on this planet. Is that what your want, only those that can spend their life earnings can go to a National Park? You may be in the 99% in America but you are in the 1% of the world. And you should thank our Constitution and Capitalist economic system for it.

  • Op-Ed| The National Park Service Could Learn A Few Things From Its African Colleagues   1 week 15 hours ago

    You are an "elite snob" . . .

    How am I a snob?

    (Whipperin was referring to Americans who "can afford to go there." How is a comparison to Africans relevant to my comment?)

  • Op-Ed| The National Park Service Could Learn A Few Things From Its African Colleagues   1 week 15 hours ago

    But if the resources that make the park a park are not conserved, then where are we?

    Ethiopia

  • Op-Ed| The National Park Service Could Learn A Few Things From Its African Colleagues   1 week 15 hours ago

    I've been to an African National Park. I'm not a "rich elite snob." Complete nonsense.

  • Op-Ed| The National Park Service Could Learn A Few Things From Its African Colleagues   1 week 15 hours ago

    But if the resources that make the park a park are not conserved, then where are we?

  • Op-Ed| The National Park Service Could Learn A Few Things From Its African Colleagues   1 week 16 hours ago

    Horses are one of the most native American animals along with the whitetail deer and pronghorn. Horses were here for millions of years and absent only briefly after the last major glacier. Elk, bison, and wolves are non native invasive species that migrated here from Asia after the last major glacier. So lets kick out species according to native senority and the amount of crap the spread and kick out bison. http://www.thecloudfoundation.org/education/wild-horses-as-a-returned-native-species/140-wild-horses-as-native-north-american-wildlife

  • Op-Ed| The National Park Service Could Learn A Few Things From Its African Colleagues   1 week 16 hours ago

    Some of the comparisons are a bit of apples to oranges. So, the Serengeti does not allow private hiking, mountain biking and I guess horse riding...

    Between the hippos, cheetahs, elephants, lions and other dangerous species, that makes sense! Plus the fact that the park is actually bigger than the state of Connecticut. Is the proposal to limit Yellowstone to a few well heeled tourists that will travel through the park on dirt roads in jeeps driven by guides?

    I get the writer wants to emphasize conservation over recreation, whatever that really means, but the comparisons used to support that opinion don't really work here.

    Or maybe, we can start by kicking out horses since they're non native to this country and they crap everywhere?

  • Op-Ed| The National Park Service Could Learn A Few Things From Its African Colleagues   1 week 17 hours ago

    Agreed Whipperin. We don't need the Serengeti zoo that only rich foreigners with their high priced guides can visit.

  • Op-Ed| The National Park Service Could Learn A Few Things From Its African Colleagues   1 week 17 hours ago

    Keep that conservation over private recreation stuff in Africa for the rich elites that can afford to go there.. The United States National Parks are for the enjoyment of the American people, so let's make the Parks more recreation friendly not less. Who cares about a National Resource that cannot be used and enjoyed by the Common People? The super rich elite want to be the only ones to get to enjoy their conservation project Parks. Who goes to those African Parks? Rich elites snobs. If I can't recreate in the Park then knowing that it is being conserved means nothing to me. The Park might as well be on the Moon.

  • Is Global Climate Change A Threat to National Parks? Another Response   1 week 19 hours ago

    NCDC has no thermometers in most of Africa, and nearly half of the rest of the land surface, so they fabricate fake land temperatures based on sea surface temperatures more than 1,000 km away

    NCDCAfricaFaking

    Global Temperature and Precipitation Maps | Temperature, Precipitation, and Drought | National Climatic Data Center (NCDC)

    To show how fraudulent this practice is, let’s look at the US where they do have surface data. The Atlantic was warm, while the US and Canada were very cold last year. You can not extrapolate temperatures across land/ocean boundaries.

    ScreenHunter_6267 Jan. 21 06.19

    What they are doing is equivalent to measuring Death Valley temperature, based on the temperature of the cold water offshore in the Pacific.

    But it gets worse – after making up these completely fake temperatures across vast swaths of the planet, they report a global temperature record of 0.02 degrees. This is scientific malfeasance – pure and simple.