Featured Articles on National Parks Traveler

20 Years On, Yellowstone National Park's Experiment With Wolves Continues To Evolve

“…A country without wolves isn’t really good country, it's incomplete - it doesn’t have its full spirit,” said Yellowstone National Park biologist Doug Smith during an interview last year with NPR’s Snap Judgement, about wolves, specifically about the life and death of a famous Yellowstone wolf, 832F, or 06.

Op-Ed| The National Park Service Could Learn A Few Things From Its African Colleagues

America’s National Park Service celebrates its 100th birthday in 2016. During the upcoming year, it’s expected the NPS will seek public comment on how best to ensure the park system and Service reach their bicentennial. The agency should look to Africa for guidance.

Study: Loss Of Colorado River Would Cripple Economies Of Seven States, From Wyoming To California

The prospect of the Colorado River running dry anytime soon is hard to fathom. But if it ever does, it will have a devastating effect on the economies of the seven states that rely on the river's life-giving waters, according to a study prepared by Arizona State University.

Musings From A Very Busy Zion National Park

I stopped at Zion on the way home from Death Valley. At first it seemed to be almost as busy as it is on a summer day. What little did I know then.

Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument Adds A Missing Link To The National Park System

A window into the last Ice Age in the present-day desert outside of Las Vegas brings a missing link into the National Park System along with a small, but enticing, possibility that fossilized human remains are buried next to those of ancient bison, camels, and even lions.

Musings From A Death Valley Christmas

Tortured. Tormented. Twisted. Schizophrenic. That’s Death Valley’s geology and geomorphic history. A tangled stratigraphy that doesn’t have sensible stratifications.

With A New Year Dawning, Here Are Some Things We'd Like For The National Park System

A new year is just beginning to shed its first blush, so the time couldn't be better to compile a list of things we'd like to see happen across the National Park System in 2015, so let's jump right in!

Mount Rainier National Park's Staffing Woes Impact Winter Fun At Paradise

One of the busiest weeks of winter has brought heavy snows to Mount Rainier National Park in Washington state, but staffing woes have closed the sledding and snow play areas at Paradise, frustrating locals and businesses in the areas close to the Nisqually Entrance in the park's southwestern corner.

The Top National Park Stories Of 2014

New units to the National Park System, a face-off over concession fees at Grand Canyon National Park that impacted nearly a quarter of the park system, and even the basic relevancy of national parks were among the top stories of 2014 involving the park system.

Wilderness Defender: Carsten Lien And The Writing Of Olympic Battleground

A prominent figure of Seattle, Washington, Carsten Lien grounded his career in business and government with a love for Olympic National Park. Alfred Runte recounts how Lien fought to save the park after observing that it had been logged. The result was a history of the park disclosing the controversy of saving old-growth forests from the Park Service itself. The book is again available as Olympic Battleground: Creating and Defending Olympic National Park. Second edition, reissued.

Wintertime Fun In National Parks Of The Rocky Mountains

Though the summer months are the peak travel seasons for national parks in the Rocky Mountain region, the winter months with their snow and cold...and often crystalline skies...are perfect for a retreat to the Rockies. Here's a handful of parks worthy of your consideration.

Some Southern National Parks To Put On Your Travel Calendar

With long, cold, snowy months descending on the northern half of the country, it's not a bad time to cast your eyes to the south and national parks where you can find warm weather, sandy beaches, and plenty of sunshine.

Experience Military Grounds As The Colonials Did

Winter isn’t the best season to be outdoors in the East, but what better season to truly appreciate what the Colonials endured 240 years ago?

Isle Royale National Park's Wolf Woes Spur Bigger Questions Of Managing Wilderness

As Isle Royale National Park managers mull the future of the park's wolf population, biologists and ecologists are urging them to step in with a genetic rescue.

For Some Park Visits, Getting There Is Definitely Part Of The Fun

The enormous variety of areas in the National Park System means there's also quite a range of experiences when it comes to getting to and from your park destination. Whether you're taking the subway or city bus to an urban park or riding a train, small plane or ferry to reach your destination in Alaska, there are plenty options for a memorable trip...and sometimes they can be memorable indeed.

Is Global Climate Change A Threat to National Parks? Another Response

In response to a guest column on climate change that disputed the belief that human activities are driving global warming, a quartet of scientists and former National Park Service employees say the evidence for anthropogenic global warming is indisputable.

Cotopaxi: A Gear Manufacturer Paying It Forward

Why is an outdoor equipment manufacturer tutoring kids in Tanzania, and donating part of their profits around the world? It's just another day for Davis Smith, the founder of Cotopaxi. Smith spent his childhood growing up in Latin America with his father, often camping on Ecuador's Mount Cotopaxi, the highest active volcano in the world, and the origins of his company name.

Exploring The Parks: A Visit To Little Rock Central High School National Historic Site

The 1950s and 1960s were a period of strife coupled with significant progress in America’s struggle with civil rights. Marches, sit-ins, and violence were accompanied by legislation, desegregation, and, in some instances, accommodation. Birmingham, Montgomery, Selma, Greensboro, and Washington, D.C. are remembered as some of the principal battlegrounds in the conflict and struggle for equal rights.

Book Review| Ghost Riders In The Sky: The Life Of Stan Jones, The Singing Ranger

Over the years park rangers have demonstrated some impressive talent, but when it comes to securing a place in entertainment history, few can compete with Stan Jones. He was working as a ranger in Death Valley National Monument in the late 1940s when a series of serendipitous events led to a remarkable new career, and his story is told in an entertaining new book, Ghost Riders In the Sky: The Life of Stan Jones, The Singing Ranger.

Trace The Natchez Trace This Winter

Travel two centuries ago was a water world, where rivers were the highways for exploration and movement across new lands. Thick forests hampered overland travel, but the need for connections between river drainages was keen, and primitive overland trails were created. The Natchez Trace is one such trail, stretching 444 miles from Natchez, Mississippi, to Nashville, Tennessee.