The Latest News & Views

Friday, February 17th, 2012

  • A Burmese python more than 16 feet in length and tipping the scales at 140 pounds has been captured at Everglades National Park, evidence of the problem park officials face with the spread of these non-native constrictors.

    The female snake was captured Monday after a park staffer came upon it while spraying non-native vegetation.

    Park officials say that "ma

Thursday, February 16th, 2012

  • Shenandoah National Park is looking ahead to spring. Superintendent Martha Bogle recently announced that facilities closed during the winter will start to open in March and will continue to open throughout the spring.

    Shenandoah's popular and historic lodging debuts at Skyland Resort on March 29th.

  • While desert-thriving vegetation commonly is thought to love heat, too much heat and reduced precipitation can doom them.

Wednesday, February 15th, 2012

  • While Congressional Republicans are investigating alleged misconduct of the National Park Service in its handling of an oyster farm at Point Reyes National Seashore, California officials are pushing the company to explain why it is out of compliance with its operating permit.

    The inquires come as the Drakes Bay Oyster Co.

  • It was back in 1998 that a dedicated search for all forms of life in Great Smoky Mountains National Park began. Now, as the All Taxa Biodiversity Inventory moves into its 15th year, the project is being celebrated with a gathering headlined by Dr. E.O.