The Latest News & Views

Monday, February 27th, 2012

  • Following the Reclamation Act of 1902, many dams, reservoirs, and canals were built in Western states during the early 1900s to provide the hydropower and irrigation water needed to support settlement, promote the spread of farming, and "allow the desert to bloom." Now, a new online travel itinerary provides easy access to site histories, essays, images, maps, and travel- and visiting-related info

Sunday, February 26th, 2012

  • A potent winter storm that descended on Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks this weekend stranded more than 150 travelers and led a snowboarder astray into the backcountry of Grand Teton.

    At its height, the storm forced the closure of the main route from Grand Teton into Yellowstone -- U.S.

  • If this is the year you want to hike to the summit of Mount Whitney in Sequoia National Park, time is running short to get your application in.

    Permit applications are found on recreation.gov, the site more and more units of the Nationa

  • Editor's note: The Traveler is expanding our coverage of national parks in other nations. We'll soon be rolling out travel features on international park destinations, but we're also christening this weekly roundup on park news from countries other than the U.S.

  • Coming upon an underground lake at Wind Cave National Park can be stunning, a pool of water surrounded by rock. But don't think about sampling the water, as it likely is high in arsenic.

    A four-year study by the U.S.