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The latest news from around the National Park System.

Good Books For Visiting...Shenandoah National Park

There's nothing like a good book or two to help you prepare for a national park visit, whether you're looking for some historical background, a trail or two to hike, or interested in the natural resources. With that in mind, here are a few titles you might consider in preparation of a visit to Shenandoah National Park in Virginia.
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Chunk Of Land Falls Into Ocean, Nearly Kills 5 At Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park

A large section of newly created land in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park collapsed into the ocean on New Year’s Eve, launching showers of volcanic rock into the air and creating a flurry of large waves that eroded away a portion of the older sea cliff and viewing area, leading to “a really close brush with death” for five visitors.
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National Park Service Moving To Protect Geothermal Resources At Valles Caldera National Preserve

Boiling, acidic calling cards of Valles Caldera National Preserve's volcanic past, some bearing such whimsical names as Stomach Trouble Spring and Laxitive Spring, should be protected under the Geothermal Steam Act List of Significant Thermal Features, according to the National Park Service.
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College Students From 13 Countries Converging On Glen Canyon National Recreation Area

On January 10, more than 200 college students representing 13 countries will revitalize one of the most important historic sites on the Colorado River as part of an education and service-based collaboration between the U.S. Department of State’s Community College Initiative Program and the National Park Service.
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"Snowbound: Animals Of Winter" Reveals Surprising Wildlife Survival Strategies And Adaptations

The coldest and snowiest places on earth pose a challenge to anyone visiting such locations as the Arctic Circle or Antarctica, but what about the year-round animal population? How do they cope for many months with life in these frozen wonderlands where temperatures can plummet to as low as minus 50 degrees?
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Bears Ears, Jigsaw Piece In Southeastern Utah's National Park Landscape, Declared National Monument

Bears Ears, a 1.35-million-acre rugged redrock landscape rich in Native American history and lore, was declared a national monument Wednesday by President Obama, whose action via the Antiquities Act quickly infuriated Utah's politicians. The wide swath of land covered by the designation includes much of land long desired by conservationists to provide the "completion" of Canyonlands National Park.
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National Parks Traveler's Essential Park Guide

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