Survey Shows Visitors Would Support Higher Entrance Fees To See Yellowstone National Park Bears

Bears in Yellowstone National Park and visitors who watch bears cost money, both in terms of the park's approach to bear management, and its approach to "bear jams" on the park's roads. And, interestingly, a study shows that a majority of Yellowstone visitors would pay as much $50 extra dollars in entrance fees to ensure the opportunity to see bears in the park.
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Unmanned Drone Crashes Into Famous Hot Spring At Yellowstone National Park

A ban on the use of drones in National Park Service areas has become a hot topic this summer, and that was literally the case last weekend at Yellowstone National Park when one of the unmanned aircraft crashed into the largest hot spring in the park. Park officials now have to figure out what threat the debris may pose to the spring itself.

Reader Participation Day: How Would You Structure User Fees For The National Parks?

Imagine, for a moment, that you're in charge of setting fees for the National Park System. What would you charge for, and how much would you charge? Or would you charge anything at all?

Color Movies From 1930 Shot In Yellowstone National Park Being Restored

A vintage movie, typical of a "home movie," shot in Yellowstone National Park decades ago is being restored by the National Archives, casting a unique light on park visitors of an earlier day. What's particularly interesting is the grainy 16mm film, thought to be black-and-white, actually was shot in color, making it one of the first color films to be shot in the park.

Exploring The Parks: Fossil Butte National Monument In Windswept Wyoming

Many national parks preserve aspects of the past, and in the case of Fossil Butte National Monument, that past goes back 55 million years ago, a time when the landscape of western Wyoming was very different from the windswept plains we see today.

Photography In The National Parks: Avoid Those Bison (And Other Wildlife) Jams

Bison madness is in full swing in Yellowstone National Park with snorting, groaning, spitting, bison bulls chasing the girls (cows) down the roads, much to the delight of many park visitors who gladly park their vehicles in the road and film the action. No family vacation is complete without getting caught in a Yellowstone bison jam.

Yellowstone National Park Crews Continue Work To Erase Illegal Trail Into Bechler Region

As big as Yellowstone National Park is -- 63 miles north to south and 54 miles east to west -- perhaps it's not too surprising that someone not interested in driving to a trailhead in the park decided to make their own on the edge of the park. But by this fall, that trail should be erased as park crews finish the second of two years' work in removing signs of the illegal trail.

"Paddling Protection Act" Raises Debate Over Wilderness Travel In Yellowstone National Park

Threading through the backcountry, and frontcountry, of Yellowstone National Park are creeks and streams fueled by springs and snowmelt, some only several feet across, some dozens of feet wide. More than 300 topple over waterfalls at least 15 feet high, while others meander placidly through the Lamar and Hayden valleys.

Classic National Park Posters On Display In Washington Until Next Spring

Despite advances made into the 21st century, some of the most striking posters promoting the national parks are those produced shortly before World War II by the Works Progress Administration. The artistry that went into these silk-screened promotions remains as striking today as it was 75 years ago. And if you find yourself in Washington, D.C., in the coming months, you can understand why with a visit to the Interior Department to see a collection of the posters.

Yellowstone National Park Officials Hope Bison Relocation Program Can Reduce Culling

In a bid to reduce the number of park bison that are sent to slaughter, Yellowstone National Park officials are exploring the process of a quarantine program that could be developed to provide brucellosis-free animals to tribes and other entities looking to build bison herds.