Time Running Out To Suggest How Yellowstone National Park Should Approach Winter-Use-Plan

Mammoth Terrace, Kurt Repanshek photo
Just a few more weeks remain for you to suggest areas that Yellowstone National Park planners should consider in preparing a plan for winter-use in the park.
I remember clearly hurrying to the Yellowstone River after finishing a shift as a seasonal ranger with fly rod in hand. I would rent a rowboat from the Fishing Bridge boat dock and row downstream a bit to clear the lines of the people fishing from the bridge. And then I would begin to cast — not too skillfully I might add — and catch a cutthroat on every second or third cast. It was absolutely the best fishing in the world.

Reader Participation Day: Where Are the Best Waterfalls In the National Park System?

Waterfall Ohe o Gorge, Haleakala National Park, copyright Q.T. Luong
Two of the most incredible waterfalls in the National Park System can be found in Yellowstone National Park. But it certainly doesn't have a monopoly on waterworks. Olympic National Park boasts the beautifully secluded Marymere Falls, Glacier National Park the towering Bird Woman Falls, and Great Smoky Mountain National Park the comparatively small but gorgeous-just-the-same Abrams Falls. What other waterfalls in the park system deserve to be singled out for their beauty?

Group Forms to Urge Plowing Of Roads In Yellowstone National Park

Bombardier at Kepler Cascades, copyright Kurt Repanshek
With Yellowstone National Park managers back at work on producing a winter-use plan pertaining to getting around the park, at least one group has mounted a campaign to see some of the park's roads plowed in winter.

Bears Starting to Emerge In Yellowstone National Park

If you're heading to Yellowstone National Park soon to view wolves, you might get a bonus: bears are beginning to emerge from their slumber and are roaming for food.

Some Biologists Envision Wolves Controlling Elk in More National Parks, Others Say That's Impractical

There was a paper that zoomed around cyberspace a couple weeks ago, one that roamed far and wide, not unlike a young wolf seeking a territory of its own. It gathered speed as it was flicked around the Twittersphere because it focused on two subjects that captivate more than a few people -- national parks, and wolves.
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Recruiting Under Way For 2010 Youth Conservation Corps at Yellowstone National Park

Firehole River sunset, copyright Kurt Repanshek
Had I only known years ago that I could have spent my high school summers in Yellowstone National Park I would have been there in a heartbeat. But I didn't know. But here's the word that your kids have an opportunity now to sign up for the Youth Conservation Corps program in Yellowstone this summer.

NRDC Sues To Have Fish and Wildlife Service Consider Whitebark Pine For Endangered Species Act Protection

It was more than a year ago when the Natural Resources Defense Council asked the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to see if the whitebark pine, a "stone" pine that grows in the very highest reaches of Yellowstone, Glacier, Rocky Mountain, Yosemite, Sequoia and Kings Canyon national parks, was eligible for Endangered Species Act protection. Inaction by the agency has prompted the conservation group to sue it to act on the request.
Fifteen years ago, back in 1995, a dream of seeing wolves running wild in Yellowstone National Park came to life, as the first of a handful or two of Canadian wolves were set free into the park. It was the culmination of a long-fought effort to see Yellowstone's ecosystem become whole once again with its complete prey and predator base. Doug Smith, who leads the park's Wolf Project, recently discussed the health of the program and what researchers have learned.

15 Years Into Yellowstone National Park's Wolf Recovery Program

Deep in Yellowstone National Park's backcountry, our sleep and the predawn darkness was startled by a sound that long had been alien to the park. But on that mid-September day in 2008 the sound was unmistakable. A lone wolf had raised its muzzle to the sky and released a rich, baritone howl that pierced the inky stillness. A long-missing aspect of the park's wildness had very much returned.