You are here

Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Great Smoky Mountains National Park Drainage Part Of Nation's First Native Fish Conservation Area

Recognizing its incredible diversity of stream life and years of efforts to conserve that diversity, the Little Tennessee River basin, which includes the Abrams Creek drainage in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, has been designated the nation’s first Native Fish Conservation Area.
bootstrap

A Life Of Conservation: Michael Frome And The National Parks

Few of us with roots in the 1960s can imagine the world of environmental writing without Michael Frome. Actually, it was my mother who first discovered his articles following our trip west in 1959. From our home in Binghamton, New York, she had driven my brother August and me 10,000 miles, visiting national parks the entire way. After spending three days each at Yellowstone, Yosemite, and Grand Canyon, we thought we had seen it all. It little occurred to us, jockeying among the crowds of other auto “campers,” that an even greater, untouched wilderness lay beyond the pullouts, roads, and parking lots. That discovery awaited the writings of Michael Frome.
bootstrap

Birding In The National Parks: Mixing Birding With Leaf-Peeping

If “October” and “travel” are in the same story, odds are good that it’s an article about the best places to see fall foliage. Of course, to those of us with birds perpetually on the brain, October is the conclusion of fall migrant season. With that in mind, I got to wondering about the best national park to maximize migrant-watching and leaf-peeping in one trip.
bootstrap

Seeking Solitude In The Smokies

Visitors come to Great Smoky Mountains National Park for many reasons. They want to hike the more than 70 miles of the rugged Appalachian Trail that meander through the park, to camp in its dense forests, to cool off in one of its many streams, or to take a leisurely drive along the scenic Newfound Gap Road that crosses the heart of the park to connect Tennessee with North Carolina. Regardless of the reason, they come—in droves. Every year, 8-10 million people travel to the Smokies, making it the most-visited national park in the country.
bootstrap

National Parks Traveler's Essential Park Guide

Recent Comments

Recent Forum Comments