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Great Smoky Mountains National Park

"It Is Obvious We Need To Educate The Visitors"

How are we to act in a national park? That might seem to carry an obvious answer, but it's not always so obvious these days. As different generations, different racial groups, and different cultures enter the National Park System, not all seem out to enjoy the natural beauty on display in the landscape parks simply by walking about and gazing at the setting, hiking or backpacking, paddling or climbing, or watching wildlife.
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Record Visitation Strained Some National Parks This Year, Creating Concern Over What 2016 Might Bring

"Find Another Park." That twist on the National Park Service's "Find Your Park" campaign leading into the agency's centennial year was voiced this year in some parks as record visitation strained staff and impacted resources and left Park Service managers wondering how high visitation might go next year, according to a sampling of parks by the Traveler.
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Black Bears Facing Hard Times At Great Smoky Mountains National Park

A poor year for their traditional foods have black bears in Great Smoky Mountains National Park roaming far and wide, leading park officials to remind visitors to keep their distance from bears and to urge folks in communities surrounding the park to keep their garbage, pet food, and bird seed out of the reach of bears.
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Birding In The National Parks: Where Should You Look For Finches This Winter?

Predicting the winter movements of semi-migratory birds can be tricky business. Sometimes birds move south because food has become scarce in the north, as was the case with Pine Siskins last winter. Other times, an abundance of food creates a hyper-successful breeding season that results in overpopulation and migration south.
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Great Smoky Mountains National Park Drainage Part Of Nation's First Native Fish Conservation Area

Recognizing its incredible diversity of stream life and years of efforts to conserve that diversity, the Little Tennessee River basin, which includes the Abrams Creek drainage in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, has been designated the nation’s first Native Fish Conservation Area.
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A Life Of Conservation: Michael Frome And The National Parks

Few of us with roots in the 1960s can imagine the world of environmental writing without Michael Frome. Actually, it was my mother who first discovered his articles following our trip west in 1959. From our home in Binghamton, New York, she had driven my brother August and me 10,000 miles, visiting national parks the entire way. After spending three days each at Yellowstone, Yosemite, and Grand Canyon, we thought we had seen it all. It little occurred to us, jockeying among the crowds of other auto “campers,” that an even greater, untouched wilderness lay beyond the pullouts, roads, and parking lots. That discovery awaited the writings of Michael Frome.
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National Parks Traveler's Essential Park Guide

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