Lake Mead National Recreation Area

Ever Consider "Adopting" A Cove at Lake Mead National Recreation Area

So many coves, and so few staff. That's the problem at Lake Mead National Recreation Area, where they're looking for volunteers to help keep the lake's coves clean.

Ban on Glass and Styrofoam Containers in Effect at Lake Mead National Recreation Area

Lake Mead.
Officials at Lake Mead National Recreation Area are expecting plenty of visitors for the holiday weekend, and they're reminding them about new regulations that went into effect last March: glass and styrofoam containers are no longer welcome in the park.

By the Numbers: Lake Mead Quagga Mussels

Do you want to see a LOT of zeroes?

KHV Virus Implicated in Lake Mohave Carp Die Off

Koi herpes virus is what’s killing the carp at Lake Mohave. KHV can’t spread to people or other fish, thank goodness, but this new disease is very bad news for carp.

National Park Quiz 58: Tunnels

Tunnel vision is one thing, but tunnel knowledge is quite another matter. See if you can sort things out in this week’s quiz. Answers are at the end. If we catch you peeking, we’ll make you hold the steel for a cross-eyed sledge wielder.

Dead Carp at Lake Mohave Make This Memorial Day Memorable for Wrong Reason

Lake Mohave.
Lake Mohave is one of two large reservoirs at Lake Mead National Recreation Area. Memorial Day weekend is traditionally one of the busiest times of the year for the park, but this year's holiday has an unwelcome wrinkle for visitors to Lake Mohave: dead carp.

The Quagga Quandry – Coming to a Lake Near You? You'd Better Hope Not.

Zebra mussels on bottom of boat.
Those tiny mussels called Quaggas cause major problems in lakes and rivers, including those in national parks, and they're spreading across the country. If you think this won't affect you, better think again.

More Low Water Woes at Lake Mead – but This Isn't the Worst Drought on Record for the Lake

Launch ramp at Lake Mead.
Lake Mead National Recreation Area is one of the most heavily-visited units in the National Park System, and its two lakes are a magnet for recreationists. Falling water levels are requiring some changes that will affect visitors to the area, but the current drought isn't the worst to impact the lake—yet.

That “America’s Marines” Commercial Shows Five NPS Units, Not Six

Nobody was able to correctly identify the NPS units in that Marine Corps commercial we invited you to look at. It’s not as simple as it seems. Here’s the solution.

Return of the Beach – A Once Popular Site Set for a Comeback at Lake Mead National Recreation Area

Aerial view of Willow Beach
The legendary phoenix may have risen from its own ashes, but a campground and other visitor facilities will soon be rising from the mud of recurring flash floods at one location in Lake Mead National Recreation Area. The mud has actually been dry for years, but there's good reason for caution in rebuilding at this location, and the project has an unusual twist or two.

Upon Further Review: Preferential Treatment for Local Residents at National Parks?

reserved parking sign
A basic principle of national parks is that they're just that—national, rather than local sites—so a family from Houston has the same opportunity to enjoy the Great Smoky Mountains as one from Gatlinburg. Officially, there's no preferential treatment in national parks for local residents, but it's only human nature for some people who live near a park and use it on a regular basis to develop a sense of "ownership" of the area.

Upon Further Review - Let Sleeping Snakes Lie

What do Hoover Dam, cold water and a rattlesnake have in common? They're all elements in a story that confirms the wisdom of a good rule for any outdoor trip: Let sleeping snakes lie.

Leave it to the Beaver

Beaver.
One of the interesting aspects of a park ranger's job is the knowledge that every day brings the possibility of a new—and frequently unusual—experience. That was definitely the case for me one day at Willow Beach, Arizona, a popular fishing spot in Lake Mead National Recreation Area.

A Surprising Option for a Western River Trip

Black Canyon, Lake Mead National Recreation Area. USGS photo by Phil Stoffer.
This short float trip on a desert river offers dramatic cliffs, wildlife and bird watching, and side canyons with hot springs. Its location in a heavily-visited Western park may surprise you.

Boulder Dam National Recreation Area – Forgotten but Not Gone?

October 13, 1936, marked the creation of Boulder Dam National Recreation Area and a brand-new category of management units for the National Park Service. The recreation area no longer exists by its original name, but its legacy continues in one of the most heavily-visited parks in the country. During their first 30 years the park and the dam underwent more name changes than the rock entertainer formerly known as….

Lake Mead National Recreation Area Hosts 150,000 Weekenders and a Hells Angels Poker Run

More than 150,000 visitors enjoyed Lake Mead National Recreation Area on Labor Day weekend. Park officials planned carefully beforehand to handle the throng, which included about 150 Hells Angels bikers passing through on a poker run. Despite a severe thunderstorm and other complications, there were few serious incidents and only one fatality.

Accidents Happen at Lake Mead National Recreation Area, Usually Because People Break Commonsense Water Safety Rules

Lake Mead National Recreation Area, which celebrated its 61st birthday August 11, attracts almost 8 million visitors a year. Nearly all return home safely with fond memories of fun on or in the park’s two huge lakes. Accidents do happen, though, and nearly always because people violate commonsense safety rules.

Violent Deaths in the National Parks

During 2006, 11 homicides were investigated across the national park system. Two involved women who had been pushed off cliffs, one was a suicide, and one was the victim of a DUI accident.
Hey Ranger!: True Tales of Humor & Misadventure from America While there are plenty of books that detail the fine line between life and death in the parks, Burnett shares a glimpse of a side of life in our national parks that draws a chuckle, not a grimace.
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