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Rocky Mountain National Park

Birding In The National Parks: Sapsuckers At Rocky Mountain National Park

There’s more to Rocky Mountain National Park than the extraordinary views from Trail Ridge Road. Willow-choked streams, open meadows, pine forests, and all the edges where those habitats meet make for a park bursting with birding opportunities. After a not particularly spectacular time up in the tundra, I enjoyed a couple wonderful birding days in two very different habitats last month. This is the story of the first of those days.
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Flood-Damaged Old Fall River Road Reopens At Rocky Mountain National Park

The Old Fall River Road is a popular route with visitors to Rocky Mountain National Park who are looking for a scenic drive at a slower pace, but the historic road was badly damaged by major flooding in September 2013. Thanks to emergency funding, repairs to the road have been completed in time for the traditional July 4 seasonal opening of the drive.
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Birding In The National Parks: Fear No Heights In Your Birding

There are two essentials for the birder exploring Rocky Mountain National Park. First, make time to look for the tundra birds along the eleven miles of Trail Ridge Road above tree line. Secondly, and even more importantly, make absolutely certain at least one licensed driver in the car does NOT suffer from acrophobia.
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Rockslide Rescue Poses Extra Challenges At Rocky Mountain National Park

As the name implies, Rocky Mountain National Park includes plenty of rocks, but a fall by a hiker in unusually rugged terrain led to a lengthy and challenging rescue earlier this week. By the time the fourteen-hour operation ended, over forty rescuers had helped lower the victim a distance that equalled the height of the tallest buildings in the country.
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Clearing Snow Off Trail Ridge Road In Rocky Mountain National Park, The Video

Every year, Rocky Mountain National Park snowplow operators begin plowing Trail Ridge Road in mid-April. Crews from the west side of the park and crews from the east side of the park move along the road and eventually meet near the Alpine Visitor Center. The visitor center is the highest in the National Park Service, sitting at 11,796 feet above sea level. Spring storms often impact plowing activities. Plow operators normally encounter drifts from 18 to 22 feet tall.
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National Parks Traveler's Essential Park Guide