Yellowstone National Park

Road Work Will Cause Some Snarls In Yellowstone National Park After Labor Day

If you're planning a trip to Yellowstone National Park next month, you'll want to read this update about road work that will cause some snarls for visitors.

Essential Park Guide, Fall '14: Your Travel Guide To The National Parks

For many, fall conjures images of blizzards of golden leaves, the eerie bugles of bull elk, and the first crisp, possibly snow-dusted, days of year’s end. For the northern half of the country these are the realities of the National Park System. There are the breathtaking days of hiking, watching wildlife on the move, and even tasting the season in the bounties of wild berries and other fruits.

Nearly 5,000 Bison Estimated To Be In Yellowstone National Park Herds

The annual summer census of bison in Yellowstone National Park shows there are about 5,000 of the iconic animals in the park.

Concessions Contract Will Cost Grand Canyon National Park $100 Million, But Benefit Park In Long Run

A new concessions contract for businesses on the South Rim of Grand Canyon National Park will cost the park $100 million, an amount that could impact just about all operations in the park, Superintendent Dave Uberuaga said Wednesday. In the long run, however, the move stands to benefit both the park and its visitors, observers believe.

Search Ongoing For Missing Tuber In Yellowstone River

Three concession workers in Yellowstone National Park decided to float down the Lamar River the other day in tubes, but only two made it to shore. The third was swept down the Yellowstone River and hasn't been found.

Birding In The National Parks: Birding By The Season Through The National Park System

National park travelers are keenly aware of the changing seasons. The Blue Ridge Parkway is a completely different experience in August than in October. The hoodoos of Bryce Canyon need to be seen both in the blistering July sun and the January snow to be fully appreciated. And, of course, there’s Yellowstone – a bustling city on a summer weekend and a tranquil white wilderness on a bright February morning.

Made In America: National Park Concessionaires Offering More Items Made In America

Next time you find yourself in a gift shop at a national park, check out where the items were made. You just might be surprised that a majority of the items are made in America, with fewer and fewer bearing an oval gold-and-black 'Made in China' sticker on them.

Traveler's View: Packrafting Deserves Consideration In Yellowstone, Grand Teton National Parks

At Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks, the National Park Service should welcome a discussion into a form of backcountry travel that, if properly managed, need not alter the decades-long experience of visiting these two magnificent parks, but rather enhance it for a small number of wilderness travelers.

Survey Shows Visitors Would Support Higher Entrance Fees To See Yellowstone National Park Bears

Bears in Yellowstone National Park and visitors who watch bears cost money, both in terms of the park's approach to bear management, and its approach to "bear jams" on the park's roads. And, interestingly, a study shows that a majority of Yellowstone visitors would pay as much $50 extra dollars in entrance fees to ensure the opportunity to see bears in the park.
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Unmanned Drone Crashes Into Famous Hot Spring At Yellowstone National Park

A ban on the use of drones in National Park Service areas has become a hot topic this summer, and that was literally the case last weekend at Yellowstone National Park when one of the unmanned aircraft crashed into the largest hot spring in the park. Park officials now have to figure out what threat the debris may pose to the spring itself.

Reader Participation Day: How Would You Structure User Fees For The National Parks?

Imagine, for a moment, that you're in charge of setting fees for the National Park System. What would you charge for, and how much would you charge? Or would you charge anything at all?

Color Movies From 1930 Shot In Yellowstone National Park Being Restored

A vintage movie, typical of a "home movie," shot in Yellowstone National Park decades ago is being restored by the National Archives, casting a unique light on park visitors of an earlier day. What's particularly interesting is the grainy 16mm film, thought to be black-and-white, actually was shot in color, making it one of the first color films to be shot in the park.

Exploring The Parks: Fossil Butte National Monument In Windswept Wyoming

Many national parks preserve aspects of the past, and in the case of Fossil Butte National Monument, that past goes back 55 million years ago, a time when the landscape of western Wyoming was very different from the windswept plains we see today.

Photography In The National Parks: Avoid Those Bison (And Other Wildlife) Jams

Bison madness is in full swing in Yellowstone National Park with snorting, groaning, spitting, bison bulls chasing the girls (cows) down the roads, much to the delight of many park visitors who gladly park their vehicles in the road and film the action. No family vacation is complete without getting caught in a Yellowstone bison jam.

Yellowstone National Park Crews Continue Work To Erase Illegal Trail Into Bechler Region

As big as Yellowstone National Park is -- 63 miles north to south and 54 miles east to west -- perhaps it's not too surprising that someone not interested in driving to a trailhead in the park decided to make their own on the edge of the park. But by this fall, that trail should be erased as park crews finish the second of two years' work in removing signs of the illegal trail.

"Paddling Protection Act" Raises Debate Over Wilderness Travel In Yellowstone National Park

Threading through the backcountry, and frontcountry, of Yellowstone National Park are creeks and streams fueled by springs and snowmelt, some only several feet across, some dozens of feet wide. More than 300 topple over waterfalls at least 15 feet high, while others meander placidly through the Lamar and Hayden valleys.

Classic National Park Posters On Display In Washington Until Next Spring

Despite advances made into the 21st century, some of the most striking posters promoting the national parks are those produced shortly before World War II by the Works Progress Administration. The artistry that went into these silk-screened promotions remains as striking today as it was 75 years ago. And if you find yourself in Washington, D.C., in the coming months, you can understand why with a visit to the Interior Department to see a collection of the posters.

Yellowstone National Park Officials Hope Bison Relocation Program Can Reduce Culling

In a bid to reduce the number of park bison that are sent to slaughter, Yellowstone National Park officials are exploring the process of a quarantine program that could be developed to provide brucellosis-free animals to tribes and other entities looking to build bison herds.

Reader Participation Day: How Has Your National Park Experience Changed In Today's Wired World?

In this age of informational instant gratification, how has your national park experience changed? For Millennials, who grew up with smartphones, texting, and Facebook, not so much. For Baby Boomers, who learned to read with actual newspapers, books, and magazines in their hands, whose phones were attached to the wall by a cord, a great deal. Is that change for the good, or the bad?

Congressman Proposes Overhaul To Fee Programs On National Parks, Other Public Lands

Legislation introduced into the U.S. House of Representatives would, if enacted as drafted, require the National Park Service to determine "a nationally consistent entrance fee policy and corresponding rate structure" for the 401 units of the National Park System, a potentially sweeping requirement that seemingly could generate tens of millions of additional dollars for the parks.

Olympic National Park Working On Long-Range Mountain Goat Management Plan

Mountain goats are spectacular animals, even iconic in places such as Glacier National Park, but they can cause problems in parks where they don't belong. At Olympic National Park, where a 1920s era introduction project brought non-native goats into the landscape, officials are embarking on a management plan for how to deal with the animals. Adding weight to the need for such a plan was the fatal goring of a hiker in the park four years ago.

National Park Service Promotes Parks As Economic Engines

Once considered largely to be worthless, national parks today are economic engines that generate $26.5 billion for the nation's economy.

Reader Participation Day: What Role Should Horses Have In The National Parks

Horses have a long, long history in America. They came to the New World with the Spaniards, and have carried riders ever since. In many national parks horses are icons, seen as both honorable steeds that carry mounted rangers and as work horses that carry both visitors and gear. But they also have impacts on the landscape, and there have been calls to ban them from the parks. But should they be banned?

Meltdown Of Fire Hole Lake Drive Just Latest Example Of Yellowstone National Park's Thermal Dynamics

Hot trails, swarms of earthquakes, and now melting roads. All are examples of the geothermal dynamics of Yellowstone National Park and evidence that the park's landscape is anything but static.

GOP Gubernatorial Candidate In Wyoming Would Open Yellowstone National Park To Grazing, Mining

Wyoming long has had an independent streak in its right-leaning politics, but a position on federal lands staked out by a Republican gubernatorial candidate still might cause some in the state to catch their breath: Taylor Haynes would open Yellowstone National Park to mining and grazing.

Temporary Repairs Allow Firehole Lake Drive To Reopen In Yellowstone National Park

Firehole Lake Drive at Yellowstone National Park, closed last week by hydrothermal activity that was melting sections of the road, has reopened.

Preserving Natural Soundscapes In The National Parks

The National Park Service (NPS) Management Policy defines natural soundscapes as “the unimpaired sounds of nature”, something to be preserved, and cherished by those visiting the parks. Think of serene, trickling creeks, cheeping robins, chirping marmots and the lullaby of crickets when dusk sweeps over your favorite park. The NPS protects these natural and cultural sounds that affect the emotions, attitudes and memories of park visitors.

Creature Feature: Wandering Wolverines

Is that a black bear cub? A badger? No, it’s a wolverine! Wolverines have distinct color patterns on their face, neck and chest making each individual animal unique, and are referred to as “skunk bears” by the Blackfeet Indians. Though their appearance leads most to believe them to be a relative of bears, they are the largest members of the weasel (mustelidae) family that exclusively live on land.

Geothermal Heat Melting Road Surface Of Firehole Lake Drive In Yellowstone National Park

Yellowstone National Park's underground "furnace" is causing problems for Firehole Lake Drive, where the heat from below is melting the asphalt.

Congressman Calls For "Wolf Safety Zone" Around Yellowstone National Park, Says Fish And Wildlife Service Acting "Irrationally" On Wolf Recovery

A congressman from Oregon is calling on Interior Secretary Sally Jewell work with Montana, Wyoming, and Idaho officials to develop a "wolf safety zone" around Yellowstone National Park, saying without one the health of the park's wolf populations will suffer.
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