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Yellowstone National Park

A Brief History Of Whiskey Use And Alcohol Bans In Yellowstone National Park

In the days of Fort Yellowstone (1886-1918), drinking was not permitted on any military grounds. Violation of this rule could result in fines or imprisonment, though not for more than a year. Additionally, if a soldier was found drunk at his post, he could have been punished by depriving him of passes to visit Gardiner, the nearest town, for a month. As a result of these rules, records and stories seem to indicate that many army soldiers would make the walk from Fort Yellowstone, located at Mammoth Hot Springs, to Gardiner for a drink and some company.

UPDATED: PEER: National Park Service Ignoring Requirement To Establish Visitor Carrying Capacities

Nearly four decades have passed since Congress directed the National Park Service to establish visitor carrying capacities for the National Park System, yet few parks have done so, according to a review by Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility.

Nine National Park System Units To Split $2 Million In Grants

The winners in Partners in Preservation: National Parks are Yellowstone National Park, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Grand Canyon National Park, Yosemite National Park, Zion National Park, World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument, Everglades National Park, Denali National Park and Mount Rainier National Park.

Yellowstone Ranger

There are more than a few new books out this year revolving around national parks, and the one that has provided the most wonderment and joy tied to rangering has been Yellowstone Ranger by Jerry Mernin, who spent more than three decades patrolling the front and backcountry of Yellowstone National Park and left us with insights, hardships, humor, and great satisfaction from a career that left him wishing he could have had "another 32 years to work in Yellowstone."

Ranger Of The Lost Art: National Park History Preserved In Historic Posters

The Robin’s egg blue poster with the bold block lettering was stained, worn, faded, and even tattered a bit around the edges. It promoted ranger programs (“a free government service”) at Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming, and is one of a unique set of posters that artists from the Works Progress Administration created in the late 1930s and early 1940s to draw interest to our national parks.

Four-Year Rehabilitation Of Grand Canyon Of Yellowstone Overlooks, Trails Underway In Yellowstone National Park

A four-year-long, multi-million-dollar project to repair and improve overlooks, trails, and parking lots along the rim of the Grand Canyon of Yellowstone River in Yellowstone National Park has gotten underway thanks to the help of the Yellowstone Park Foundation.

National Parks Traveler's Essential Park Guide

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