Resources For Planning A Death Valley National Park Vacation

This is where you can find things such as websites, helpful phone numbers, friends groups and cooperating associations, and, sometimes, books relating to the park.

Death Valley National Park: www.nps.gov/deva

Visitor Information

760-786-3200

For information on backcountry camping, visit this site:

http://www.nps.gov/deva/planyourvisit/backcamp.htm

Fees:

Seven-day vehicle access: $20

Seven-day access by foot, bicycle, or motorcycle: $10

Death Valley National Park Annual Pass: $40

To view the park map, visit this page.

To view backcountry road maps, visit this page.

Friends Organization:

The Death Valley Natural History Association is dedicated to the preservation and interpretation of the natural and cultural history of the Death Valley region in cooperation with government partners.

Helpful Books:

Yosemite & The Southern Sierra

There are times when one national park jaunt could entail visits to several national parks, and so you might think you'll need several guidebooks to the parks on your itinerary. Well, if you're heading to the High Sierra parks of Yosemite, Sequoia, and Kings Canyon, there's just one book you really need.

Stars Above, Earth Below, A Guide To Astronomy In the National Parks

Add Stars Above, Earth Below, a Guide to Astronomy in the National Parks to your library and you'll not only gain a better appreciation of the dark skies over national parks, but you'll also be better informed on the stars twinkling at you.

Common Southwestern Plants, An Identification Guide

Anyone who spends time hiking in the national parks of the Southwest needs a good plant identification book. And Common Southwestern Native Plants, An Identification Guide, is one of those books.

Death Valley Photographer's Guide: Where and How To Get The Best Shots

There are some obvious photo opportunities in Death Valley National Park. Everyone wants a shot from Badwater, the lowest point in the Northern Hemisphere. And Artist's Palette is a given. But then what? Well, Dan Suzio has some suggestions for you.