Camping in Glacier

With 13 front-country campgrounds, Glacier National Park offers more than 1,000 campsites for you to choose from -- or compete for, depending on the season.

Fortunately, the park makes it easy for you to see which campgrounds have sites still available, and which are sold out. In fact, from this webpage you can jump to a page that will tell you what time of day the campground filled, which is good for planning purposes.

Outside the park, there are quite a few commercial campgrounds near both West Glacier and St. Mary.

Apgar Campground

Apgar Campground ($20/night) is the largest campground in Glacier. It is near Apgar Village, where you will find the Apgar Visitor Center, gift shops, a camp store, and a casual restaurant. Also available in the village are horseback ride reservations, boat rentals, a shuttle service, and Red Bus tour reservations.

The campground is situated in trees and provides tent and RV campers with shade and some privacy. Potable water is accessible in the campground, and restroom facilities have both flush toilets and sinks with running water. Evening sunsets on Lake McDonald are only a short stroll from the campground, and there are evening ranger programs at the Apgar Amphitheater. Check the park's ranger guided activity schedule for seasonal programs.

For those interested in dayhiking, many trails are located within a short drive of the campground.

Apgar Campground is open for primitive camping April 1 through May 1 and again in the Fall from October 14 through November 30. Primitive camping is $10 per night.

Avalanche Campground

Avalanche Campground ($20/night) is located in one of the most popular sections of Glacier on the west side of the Continental Divide. The campground is surrounded by towering old growth cedar and hemlock trees, which help keep the area cool during the summer months. The campground accommodates tent and RV campers; however, only 50 sites will accommodate vehicle lengths up to 26 feet. Potable water is accessible in the campground, and restroom facilities feature flush toilets and sinks with running water.

Sites are on a first-come, first-serve basis.

Bring your hiking boots and binoculars if you are staying at Avalanche Campground. Two popular day hikes, Trail of the Cedars, and Avalanche Lake, provide gorgeous scenery and glimpses of birds and wildlife. Plant enthuisiasts will appreciate the diverse species of flora.

Be sure to check out many of the evening programs with a ranger at the Avalanche Amphitheater, just a short stroll from the campground.

Bowman Lake Campground

Bowman LakeBowman Lake Campground ($15/night) is located in the North Fork area of Glacier, approximately 32.5 miles from the west entrance and 30 miles from the Canadian border. The drive to Bowman Lake is a very slow, dusty, and bumpy one on dirt roads, and passes through the tiny community of Polebridge and sections of the park that notably burned in 1988.

Mountains tower over pristine Bowman Lake. The campground is close to the shore and campsites have trees for shade and some privacy. Tent campers looking for peace and quiet will enjoy Bowman Lake for its serenity and remote location. Be sure to pack bug repellent or headnets though, as mosquitoes often take up residence at Bowman Lake. Potable water is available from water spigots in the campground; pit toilets are nearby.

Sites are on a first-come, first-serve basis.

A picnic area provides day use visitors with the opportunity to enjoy a peaceful lunch, and there are day hiking opportunities near Bowman Lake for hikers eager to experience Glacier's wilderness. Fisherman, canoers, and kayakers will enjoy the recreational opportunities Bowman Lake offers. Motorized vessels are allowed on Bowman Lake, but are limited to 10 horsepower or less.

Limited amenities can be found in Polebridge.

RVs and truck and trailer combinations are not recommended at Bowman Lake due to the nature of the long, narrow, and windy dirt road to the campground. Turning vehicles around (3-point turns required) is difficult.

Primitive camping is available, depending on weather and road conditions, prior to May 23 and after September 15. Primitive camping is $10.00 per night. During primitive camping season there is no water available and campers are advised to bring their own drinking water.

Cut Bank Campground

The Cut Bank Campground ($10/night) is found on the east side of the park and provides a sense of peace and quiet that might not be found in larger campgrounds within the park.

The campground, reached via a 5-mile long dirt road off U.S. 89, is located among trees that provide shade and privacy for tent campers. RVs are not recommended due to the nature of the road and campground layout.

Sites are on a first-come, first-serve basis.

Trailheads are near the campground for day hiking use or extended trips in the backcountry. Shuttle service can be found nearby on Highway 89 at the beginning of the dirt road that leads to the campground.

Dayhiking opportunities are available at Cut Bank and offer spectacular views of the interior of Glacier. Cut Bank offers campers the opportunity to enjoy a primitive camping experience with serenity and solitude.

There is no water available at Cut Bank Campground, so be sure to bring your own.

FIsh Creek Campground

Fish Creek Campground ($23/night) is located just off the Camas Road approximately 2.5 miles from Apgar Village on the west side of Glacier. It is the second-largest campground in the park.

Sites within the campground are surrounded by trees and provide shade and some privacy to both tent and RV campers. Some sites, though not directly on the shore of Lake McDonald, offer filtered views of the lake. Potable water is accessible in the campground, and restroom facilities provide flush toilets and sinks with running water.

In summer a park ranger hosts nightly evening programs at the Fish Creek Amphitheater, speaking on a variety of subjects about Glacier. Check the park's ranger guided activity schedule for more information.

Fish Creek serves as a central location to many day hikes in the area, including the Rocky Point Trail, where you have the opportunity to hike through a burn area from the Robert Fire of 2003. Take advantage of morning and evening drives along the Camas Road where there is a good chance of seeing wildlife.

Fish Creek is one of two campgrounds in the park that take reservations. You may sign up through the National Reservation System at http://www.recreation.gov/. Sites not reserved ahead of time are available on a first-come, first-serve basis.

Kintla Lake Campground


Kintla LakeKintla Lake Campground ($15/night) is Glacier's most remote frontcountry and car-camping campground. It is located in the uppermost northwest section of the park known as the North Fork, approximately 40 miles from the west entrance and the Canadian border.

Though the drive is very slow and bumpy on dirt roads, the scenery along the way is spectacular. Part of the drive takes you through the tiny community of Polebridge and sections of the park that notably burned in 1988 and 2003.

Due to its remote location, the campground is very quiet and very rarely filled, offering tent campers a sense of solitude. The campground sits on Kintla Lake and is surrounded by trees, providing shade, cover, and filtered views of the lake and the mountains that circle it.

A hand pump is available for potable water, and pit toilets are located in the campground as well.

For those who canoe and kayak, Kintla Lake is a paddler's paradise; no motorcraft are allowed. Fisherman will also enjoy Kintla Lake for the trout found in it. And if you like to hike, pack your boots, as day hikes and extended trips into the backcountry can be found near the campground. It isn't uncommon to hear the memorable howls of wolves at night. Limited amenities can be found in Polebridge.

RVs and truck and trailer combinations are not recommended at Kintla Lake due to the nature of the long, narrow, and windy dirt road to the campground. Sites are on a first-come, first-serve basis. Primitive camping is available, depending on weather and road conditions, prior to May 23 and after September 15. Primitive camping is $10 per night. During primitive camping season there is no water available and campers are advised to bring their own drinking water.

Logging Creek Campground

The Logging Creek Campground ($10/night), one of the smaller campgrounds in Glacier, is located south of Polebridge on the west side of the park. Access is via the narrow and winding Inside North Fork Road, which is dusty in summer. Caution is advised when traveling this road, and RVs are not recommended.

Once there, you'll discover a small primitive campground with all the solitude one could want. Sites are fist-come, first-served. The trailhead to Logging Lake is nearby and the easy hike to the lake is a great family day hike. No services are available in this area, but Polebridge (9 miles north) has limited services. You need to bring your own water, since none is available at this primitive campground.

Many Glacier Campground

The campground at Many Glacier ($20/night) is one of the most popular campgrounds in the park. Camp sites are on a first-come, first-serve basis, and due to the popularity of this campground, it is suggested you arrive early.

The campground is situated within trees for tent and RV campers, though there are only 13 sites that can accommodate vehicle lengths up to 35 feet. Potable water is accessible in the campground, and restroom facilities are equipped with flush toilets and sinks with running water. Be sure to join a ranger for nightly evening programs. Please see the park's ranger guided activity schedule for seasonal programs.

The nearby Swiftcurrent Motor Inn houses a combination gift shop and camp store, and a casual restaurant. Shuttle service is also available here. A separate building near the Swiftcurrent Motor Inn houses token-operated showers (3 shower stalls for men, 4 shower stalls for women, and 1 ADA accessible unisex shower stall). The historic Many Glacier Hotel, situated on Swiftcurrent Lake, is located down the road from the campground. Here you will find dinning opportunities, interpretive programs, boat tours, horse rides, shuttle service, and Red Bus tours.

Bring your binoculars, as there are opportunities to view wildlife like bighorn sheep and bears. Many Glacier also provides access to some of the best day hikes in the park, including a hike to one of the park's largest glaciers, so don't forget your hiking boots.

Primitive camping is available from 9/22 - 10/31 or until closed by weather conditions. The fee for primitive camping is $10 per night. During primitive camping season there is no water available and campers are advised to bring their own drinking water.

Quartz Creek Campground

Lower Quartz LakeQuartz Creek Campground ($10/night) is the smallest campground in Glacier and is considered to be primitive. It is located on the west side of the park and is accessed by the Inside North Fork Road, a rough, dusty, dirt road with many blind curves and few pullouts. The maximum speed is 20 mph, so the drive can be long if traveling from the Fish Creek area. Less, if traveling from Polebridge.

Tent campers will enjoy a truly wilderness experience at the campground. This small campground is located within trees and views are limited, though a 6.2 mile (one way) day hike to Lower Quartz Lake will provide great views. The campground is equipped with pit toilets. Limited amenities can be found in Polebridge.

RVs and truck and trailer combinations are not recommended at Quartz Creek due to the nature of the long, narrow, and windy dirt road to the campground. Sites are on a first-come, first-serve basis.

There is no water available at Quartz Creek Campground, so be sure to bring in your own drinking water.

Rising Sun Campground

Rising Sun Campground ($20/night) is located where "the mountains meet the prairies," just west of St. Mary and halfway along St. Mary Lake.

Campers at Rising Sun will enjoy beautiful sunrises in the morning with Red Eagle Mountain as a backdrop, and the campground serves as a convenient basecamp to many day hikes located east of Logan Pass. Some sites are open, allowing for cool breezes throughout the day, while others are located among trees, accommodating those seeking some shade and privacy. Potable water is accessible in the campground, and restroom facilities are equipped with flush toilets and sinks with running water.

Sites are on a first-come, first-serve basis.

Be sure to join a ranger for nightly evening programs. Please see the park's ranger guided activity schedule for more information.

Adjacent to the campground is a camp store, a casual restaurant, and token operated showers (1 shower stall for men, and 1 shower stall for women). Boat tours on St. Mary Lake are located near Rising Sun, and shuttle service is available at this location.

Sprague Creek Campground

Lake McDonaldSprague Creek is a small campground ($20/night) located on the northeast shore of Lake McDonald, about 9 miles from the west entrance of the park. Campsites are on a first-come, first-serve basis, and due to the size of this campground, it is suggested you arrive early.

The campground is located within trees, providing shade during warm summers. Some sites near the shore have unobstructed views of Lake McDonald. Due to its location along the Going-to-the-Sun Road, the campground is not as quiet as other locations in the park, and vehicles can be heard driving by. Tent campers, however, will enjoy this campground as no towed units are allowed due to the nature of the road within the campground.

Potable water is accessible in the campground, and restroom facilities provide flush toilets and sinks with running water. A picnic area is also located within the campground.

Amenities such as a camp store, resturant, gift shop, tour buses, boat tours, and horse rides can be found at the historic Lake McDonald Lodge, about a mile from the campground. Evening programs with a ranger are also located at Lake McDonald Lodge.

St. Mary Campground

St. Mary Campground ($23/night) is the largest campground on the east side of the park, and is located approximately one-half-mile from the St. Mary Visitor Center. Activities such as interpretive programs, book sales, shuttle service, and Red Bus tours are located at the visitor center.

Though shade may be sparse, aspen trees grace this campground with rustling sounds from spring and summer breezes and colorful splashes of yellow and gold late in the season. Views of Singleshot, East Flattop, and Red Eagle Mountains complement the landscape. Potable water is accessible in the campground, and restroom facilities provide flush toilets and sinks with running water.

A couple of miles down the road and outside the park you will find amenities such as restaurants, gift shops, camp stores, gas, and a grocery store.

St. Mary is one of two campgrounds in the park that take reservations. You may sign up through the National Reservation System at http://www.recreation.gov/. Sites are reservable June 1 through September 3. Sites not reserved ahead of time are available on a first-come, first-serve basis.

At other times, when the campground is open, all sites are first-come, first-served. Primitive camping is available April 1 through May 22 and again Septmeber 22 through October 30 for $10 per night. Winter camping begins November 1 and runs through March. There is no fee for winter camping but a valid park enterance pass is required.

When the campground is open for primitive or winter camping, there is no water available and campers are advised to bring their own drinking water.

Two Medicine Campground

Before the Going-to-the-Sun Road opened for vehicle traffic, Two Medicine ($20/night) was an extremely popular destination for visitors. Still holding its majestic beauty, Two Medicine is now a quiet and peaceful location in Glacier, located approximately 13 miles from East Glacier. Sites are on a first-come, first-serve basis.

Sites within the campground at Two Medicine are generally shaded by trees and offer some privacy from other campers. Thirteen sites can accommodate RVs up to 32 feet. Potable water is accessible in the campground, and restroom facilities are equipped with flush toilets and sinks with running water. Be sure to join a ranger for nightly evening programs at the amphitheater within the campground. Check the park's ranger guided activity schedule for more information.

On the shore of Two Medicine Lake stands what used to be the Two Medicine Chalet. Built by the Great Northern Railway, it now serves as a camp store and gift shop, and is a registered historic landmark. Shuttle service, boat tours, and Red Bus tours can be found at Two Medicine. There are numerous day hiking opportunities available, including a handicap accessible trail to Running Eagle Falls. Wildlife enthusiasts will want to have their binoculars handy in Two Medicine.

Sites are on a first-come, first-serve basis. Primitive camping is available from 9/22 - 10/31 or until closed by weather conditions. The fee for primitive camping is $10 per night. During primitive camping season there is no water available and campers are advised to bring their own drinking water.