The Red-Rock Splendor Of Arches And Canyonlands National Parks

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Kurt Repanshek's picture

Arches and Canyonlands are two red-rock jewels not just of Utah, but of the entire National Park System. Side-by-side, separated only by a thin, two-lane highway, these parks showcase some of the most amazing -- and the most jaw-dropping -- landscapes you’ll ever see.

Transcript

Arches and Canyonlands are two red-rock jewels not just of Utah, but of the entire National Park System. Side-by-side, separated only by a thin, two-lane highway, these parks showcase some of the most amazing -- and the most jaw-dropping -- landscapes you’ll ever see.

But there’s more than just landscapes in these two parks. There’s history -- both relatively recent, and that of long, long ago. You’ll find open-air art galleries created by ancient shamans, cowboy camps, and incredible recreational pursuits.

On one side of U.S. 191, Arches displays the world’s greatest collection of stone arches, bridges, and windows. There are more than 2,000 known arches here, And there are fins -- long, slender fingers of stone that could eventually form new arches -- as well as the rubble of arches fallen long ago.

Across the highway, the hallmark of Canyonlands are the staggering clefts that erosion has cut into the colorful underbelly of the Colorado Plateau.

But erosion did a funny thing at Canyonlands. Not only did it cut those spectacular canyons, but it also carved colorful minarets that rise above the park’s Needles District.

I’m Kurt Repanshek, founder of National Parks Traveler, and I invite you to spend a few minutes exploring the landscapes of these two parks. Arches and Canyonlands not only showcase geology, but carry traces of long-ago cultures...and provide the underpinning for some incredible recreational experiences such as white-water rafting, hiking, mountain biking, even canyoneering.

This is just a sampler, something to whet your appetite for planning a visit of your own to experience these parks in person.

Enjoy!

Comments

That was pretty fantastic. I think I just changed my trip next summer.

It is National Park Week, so enjoy Arches and Canyonlands National Parks with free entrance fees through April 29 2012. Traveling with children? Arches has these special
Junior Ranger Programs
going on to celebrate National Park Week at Arches.

We have been to both National Parks, plus Dead Horse Mesa. Pictures do not do the parks justice. A must see. We went right after Easter Temperature was in the 70's very few
people.