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NPT Reviews of Books and other Material

A collection of book reviews to help you pick the perfect read for your national park escape

The 10 Best of Everything Families: An Ultimate Guide for Travelers

The problem with the "10 best" of anything books, articles or wish-lists is that you're bound to fail from the get-go. That's one reason why the Traveler has yet to release its Top 10 National Parks list. As soon as you begin listing the "ten best" of anything, you're trolling for a debate.

Submerged: Adventures of America's Most Elite Underwater Archeology Team

I always liked the acronym, SCRU, the best, I thought, in the federal government. It stood for the Submerged Cultural Resources Unit, a collection of National Park Service world-class divers stationed in Santa Fe, New Mexico, who also happened to be professional archaeologists, anthropologists, and illustrators.

Forever on the Mountain

How truly self-reliant are we, really? When you head down the trail, do you go confident that you can manage any situation you find yourself in? If you "push the envelope" by embarking on, say, a remote canyoneering adventure, a summit climb, or a river trip, how much confidence should you place not just in your own ability but in search-and-rescue teams to quickly respond when the unimaginable occurs?

Adios Amigos: Tales of Sustenance and Purification in the American West.

"River time." It's that blissful oasis reached only by pushing off from terra firma, leaping board a raft, kayak, or canoe, and leaving the real world behind. Preferably for more than an afternoon. In the West, this generally is accomplished by heading for the Middle Fork of the Salmon, the Green, the Selway, or the Lochsa rivers. For those truly lucky souls, it means putting in from Lee's Ferry onto the Colorado River for two or more weeks of riverine solitude.

The Wild Trees: A Story of Passion and Daring

California’s northern coast holds many secrets. The foggy landscape is full of imposing mountains, windswept beaches, and valleys that rival the hollows of the Smokies in terms of narrow inaccessibility. Bigfoot is rumored to live in the area, and somewhere the world’s tallest living being, a coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) named "Hyperion," stands witness to the passage of more than two thousand years.

National Parks Traveler's Essential Park Guide

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