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Wildlife

"Snowbound: Animals Of Winter" Reveals Surprising Wildlife Survival Strategies And Adaptations

The coldest and snowiest places on earth pose a challenge to anyone visiting such locations as the Arctic Circle or Antarctica, but what about the year-round animal population? How do they cope for many months with life in these frozen wonderlands where temperatures can plummet to as low as minus 50 degrees?
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Moose And Wolves: Managing For Wilderness Values At Isle Royale National Park

Daytime temperatures at Isle Royale National Park were forecast to reach no warmer than 6 degrees Fahrenheit on Sunday, a biting cold that, if it got no warmer at the national park for a month or so, just might solve the National Park Service's quandry over what to do about an apex predator, the wolf, that is about to blink out on the island.
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UPDATED: National Park Service Lays Out Four Options On Whether To Help Isle Royale National Park Wolves

National Park Service officials, in a move likely to spur debate over how wilderness is managed, are proposing to bring 20-30 wolves into Isle Royale National Park in Michigan to offset a dwindling presence of wolves and at the same time counter a burgeoning moose population that biologists fear could overwhelm the island park's ecosystem.
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Olympic National Park's Mountain Goat Population Grows Past 600 Animals

Olympic National Park's population of nonnative mountain goats has grown past 600 animals and could increase by 45 percent over the next five years if current reproduction trends continue and no efforts are made to blunt the population, according to a report from the U.S. Geological Survey.
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Permit Issued To Kill Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area Mountain Lion

In the quilt of public and private lands that fall within the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area, wild and domestic animals live relatively side-by-side. But when animals such as mountain lions view alpacas and goats as meals, then California officials can essentially sign death warrants for the cats. That's been done in the case of P-45, a mountain lion thought to be responsible for the recent predation of 11 alpacas and a goat.
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