Recent comments

  • President-Elect Obama's Team Hints At Reversing BLM Leasing Decisions in Utah   5 years 41 weeks ago

    Geez, Anon, do you have anything to say other than recite talking points?

    Try researching issues for yourself and come back with an educated opinion.

  • Glory, Shame, and Remembrance at Colorado’s Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site   5 years 41 weeks ago

    I agree...get over it for crissakes. Everybody is a "victim" these days. And they use that status to feed at the public trough.

  • President-Elect Obama's Team Hints At Reversing BLM Leasing Decisions in Utah   5 years 41 weeks ago

    Kurt: God forbid such a terrible misdeed to be enacted upon this scared land that offers so much to the world in natural beauty and recreation. This pathetic insensitivity by the Bush administration is just another example of the callus behavior that reflects more rape, pillage and greed. This is Bush's last stance of in your face politics to scorch earth the environment before leaving office. Yap, trash the White House files, burn the bridges and pollute the environment before leaving to his Texas peacock ranch. Bush your legacy as President will be written in heavy scorn for many many years to come.

  • President-Elect Obama's Team Hints At Reversing BLM Leasing Decisions in Utah   5 years 41 weeks ago

    That's O.K., we'll not need jobs cause Uncle Obama will be spreadin' the wealth!

  • Zion National Park Officials To Examine Needs of Canyon Shuttle System   5 years 41 weeks ago

    I live just an hour away from Zion and visit the Park many times a year. Each year I look forward to the shuttles closing so I can drive anywhere in the park, stop and get out my camera. I can come for a few hours or the whole day. But that works because there are few cars in the park from late October through March. While I miss being able to use my car in the summer I'd get much more frustrated trying to find a parking space than I get having to use the shuttle. So shuttle on!

  • Glory, Shame, and Remembrance at Colorado’s Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site   5 years 41 weeks ago

    Let it go!
    It was 150 years ago!

  • Glory, Shame, and Remembrance at Colorado’s Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site   5 years 41 weeks ago

    What about the German-American that were internment? Why hasn't my family seen reparations?

  • Zion National Park Officials To Examine Needs of Canyon Shuttle System   5 years 41 weeks ago

    When we visited relatives in Las Vegas about a year ago, we went up to Zion for a day trip. I was somewhat leery of the shuttles, wondering if they would be on time and come by frequently.

    After experiencing it, I wouldn't have it any other way. I can't imagine what Zion would be like if everyone was driving their own cars. With the shuttle you don't have to worry about driving or parking. Even if you don't have a lot of time for hiking, with the shuttle you can just hop on for the ride up and back while you sit back and enjoy the scenery.

  • President-Elect Obama's Team Hints At Reversing BLM Leasing Decisions in Utah   5 years 41 weeks ago

    I'm not sure what can be done before the new administration takes office. After that time, the DOI can be instructed to attach additional environmental requirements to outstanding leases, and I think that will be the best defense against this assault on some of America's most treasured public lands.

    On another note, BLM's Utah State Director Selma Sierra has 2.5 months worth of mischief left, hopefully the damage she does can be undone once President Obama takes office and she can be "reassigned".

  • Election 2008: Fearless Forecasts, Foregone Conclusions, and Prescient Prognostications   5 years 41 weeks ago

    Maybe with the new administration Delaware will finally get a unit in the National Park System.

  • Election 2008: Fearless Forecasts, Foregone Conclusions, and Prescient Prognostications   5 years 41 weeks ago

    G. Pinson: Well said!

    I would go one step further and say that only those with "national park" status should be administered by the NPS. The other designations should be managed by different agencies or organizations.

  • Election 2008: Fearless Forecasts, Foregone Conclusions, and Prescient Prognostications   5 years 41 weeks ago

    " It is a major understatement to say that I don’t trust Ms. Pelosi, who is a whole hell of a lot further to the left of center than the American public..."

    You've just earned my undying respect with that gutsy statement, Bob. I had you all wrong. You're willing to take on politicians from both sides of the aisle. I was about to take your site off my home page, but instead I'll make it mandatory morning reading (even if I disagree occassionally and flame you in a comment).

    I'm sure Ms Pelosi has her good points, but she is extremally devisive and provides one of the greatest challenges to President elect Obama's stated goal of bringing our country together.

    I live near (and recreate in) the Golden Gate National Recreation Area and don't believe it warrants National Park status, although it should be protected as it currently exists. Being located in the San Francisco Bay area, a stronghold of environmentalism, I feel it's safety is ensured. For those who have never visited GGNRA, it is really a collection of small pieces within an urban environment. Some of the parts are extremely beautiful and others are merely isolated pockets of old military buildings. I would guess that is the reasoning for the plural designation of Parks.

    Maybe I'm being silly, but giving a few acres of old warehouses (Ft. Cronkite etc) the same status as Yellowstone, Yosemite, Glacier and the Grand Canyon, doesn't set right by me. Even that elegant old fort, the Presidio, doesn't warrant that honor. National Park status should be reserved for truly awe inspiring gradear. Anything less should be a monument, wilderness area or recreation area.

  • Fort Davis National Historic Site, Home of the Buffalo Soldiers   5 years 41 weeks ago

    Nice piece Claire,

    I'm inspired to see the place!

    The Buffalo Soldiers also played important and almost forgotten role in the histories of Yosemite and Sequoia NPs. Interpreter Shelton Johnson has done some fantastic work researching and telling their story.

    http://www.nps.gov/archive/yose/nature/articles/buffs.htm

    I love this passage from one of Johnson's articles:

    "One day I wandered into Yosemite’s Research Library and was talking to the librarian when I noticed an old photograph. I took a closer look at the picture and read the caption. It was a photograph of the 24th Mounted Infantry taken somewhere in Yosemite in 1899. The 24th, along with the 25th Infantry and the 9th and 10th Cavalry, were African-American Army regiments that during the Indian War period became known as Buffalo Soldiers. In 1903, four troops of the 9th Cavalry became among the first “rangers” assigned to protect Yosemite and Sequoia & General Grant (Kings Canyon) National Parks. For me, as an African-American park ranger, seeing this photograph was like stumbling into my own family while traveling in a foreign country."

  • Lame Duck Bush Administration Hastens to Weaken Environmental Protection Laws   5 years 41 weeks ago

    Thanks for the begrudging recognition that Congressman Grijalva (upon whose statements your article was based) misrepresented the Yellowstone bison management issue. Your thesis seems to be that Grijalva made many accusations, so what difference does it make if one is falacious? We have all the others to mindlessly believe! My view is why should I trust anything a proven liar says, until it's proven to be true. I only pointed out one of Grijalva's faulty claims ("Buffalo" Bush, the Bison exterminator), but we can go on to others, if you like, thus diminishing the believability of the "overwhelming body" of Grijalva statements. That wouldn't be necessary if you'd document "the overwhelming body of evidence" that you claim "supports the conclusion..." you'd like us to believe. And instead of interpreting said evidence, from one viewpoint, why not get an opinion from the Bush administration for their motivation in their alleged action (assuming they took such action). If they can't come up with a valid reason for their acts, we, the Traveler readers, are smart enough to catch them in their prevarifications.

    I really don't see myself as an apologist for the Bush administration, nor the Clinton administration, nor the upcoming Obama admistration. However, when people from either political extreme, or extreme of one issue, disseminate false and inflamatory information it fuels a bitter polarization that is counterproductive to achieving goals supported by the overwhelming body of the American public. Accusations aren't a body of evidence. We, the Traveler readers, want facts from unbiased sources, and we'd like both sides of the story.

  • Zion National Park Officials To Examine Needs of Canyon Shuttle System   5 years 41 weeks ago

    The shuttle system is NOT good if you have a baby, which is really the only downfall of the shuttle system I've found. When my first was as old as 2 and a half, it was ok because a toddler requires a lot less baggage compared to a baby. Well... we have another baby -she is just a month old- and we scratched Zion off of our travel plans for next summer because of the shuttle. With the baby, the hiking stroller, the mammoth diaper bag, the backpacks for us, the water bottles... there is simply way too much stuff to juggle and try to squeeze on and off of a crowded shuttle. A pack mule would be much more efficent when traveling with a baby than the shuttle bus.

    We were at Zion 2 years ago and we found that when traveling with kids, going during the early morning hours or in the evening was the only way to go. The main problem, for those of you with families who want to go visit Zion, is that the shuttles fill up to capacity during the afternoon. We found that if we got off the shuttle for any reason, we would be waiting for a long time -as much as 7 different shuttle buses to pass- before we found a shuttle bus that had room for us to get back on. Kids get down right hostile after the 3rd or 4th bus passes and they still aren't able to get on it, especially if they've run out of water. However, early in the morning (which is the best time in the summer to experience the park anyway without the super heat) the buses aren't nearly as crowded, and after 4 they tend to lighten up too, based on our experience.

    I completely understand why Zion went to shuttles, and I completely support the concept. Once our newest family member learns how to walk, we'll go back. It's spectacular!

  • Zion National Park Officials To Examine Needs of Canyon Shuttle System   5 years 41 weeks ago

    I have used the shuttle and found it great. Keep it running. There is no need for cars in the park on a wholesale basis.

  • Zion National Park Officials To Examine Needs of Canyon Shuttle System   5 years 41 weeks ago

    We visited Zion a year ago and I, too, was distressed to not have my car with me. It is so convenient and it is what we were used to. But, the shuttles were very user friendly and it was not nearly as bad as I thought it would be. We didn't have to spend time looking for a parking spot. the shuttles run quite frequently and there plenty of stops. I was worried about riding a bus with hiking gear but that was no problem. The good things very much outweighed the inconvenience of not having the car.

  • Zion National Park Officials To Examine Needs of Canyon Shuttle System   5 years 41 weeks ago

    Our family of four visited Zion and 4-5 other parks a few summers back.
    When we found out we would need to take a shuttle bus I thought they were
    kidding. I love my car. BUT - it worked out just fine - the buses ran just about on time
    and when they were a little late getting to the stop to pick us up, no problem - you
    were in Zion, the scenery is beautiful. And no doubt the beauty was enhanced by the fact there
    were no traffic jams.

  • Zion National Park Officials To Examine Needs of Canyon Shuttle System   5 years 41 weeks ago

    I have found the flexibility of shuttle services at various National Parks to be a great way to explore, much easier than driving my own rig.
    And the Zion shuttle looks to be about just right!
    With a fully loaded day pack I will catch the first bus into the park, get off at any one of the many stops and take to a trail. Catch up with another shuttle at a stop, jump off at another stop and explore.
    Repeat until the driver says, "Whoa there pal, I am the last bus!" :-)

  • Zion National Park Officials To Examine Needs of Canyon Shuttle System   5 years 41 weeks ago

    Anon, I normally prefer to have my own vehicle for the flexibility, too. But in Zion Canyon during the summer months, having a personal vehicle is a liability. There simply isn't enough parking in the canyon in the summer, and people often drove up and down the road over and over looking for a spot. It's very stressful and clouds enjoyment--and the air--of the park. In contrast, the shuttle eliminates the stress of driving and searching for non-existent parking. Shuttles operate frequently, and without cars on most of Zion Canyon Drive, visitors are safer to bike or walk the road. By doing so, they'll be able to enjoy an Anasazi ruin, a waterfall, the river, deer, tarantulas, and more that they could never have experience from the confines of their cars. Winter in Zion Canyon--I'm told--is another matter entirely.

  • Zion National Park Officials To Examine Needs of Canyon Shuttle System   5 years 41 weeks ago

    The only way to get into Zion Canyon proper, unless you're staying at the lodge, is by shuttle. That said, the shuttle is seasonal. It usually operates from mid-to-late March into October.

    You can find a primer on the shuttle here.

  • Zion National Park Officials To Examine Needs of Canyon Shuttle System   5 years 41 weeks ago

    Is the shuttle the only way one can get around now? Have they completely eliminated vehicles? I hope not! I would rather have my own vehicle and the flexibility it offers.

  • Zion National Park Officials To Examine Needs of Canyon Shuttle System   5 years 41 weeks ago

    I was lucky enough to work in Zion during the shuttle's inaugural summer; the shuttle drastically improved air quality in and restored a quality of silence and serenity to Zion Canyon. Whatever the glitches in the system, I'm sure they can be worked out rather easily.

  • Bison Might be Allowed to Range Further Beyond Yellowstone National Park Borders   5 years 41 weeks ago

    In bison circles, this plan is being met with a "so what" because of what Amy says in the article. If bison are still being pushed back after May 15, de facto this changes almost nothing and creates just a different set of headaches. This remains a bison control plan and not a wildlife management plan.

    When I first read about it yesterday, I was a little excited until I realized that the essential boundaries haven't changed. All it does in effect is make an amendment of what are known as Zone 2 areas, which are tolerance areas only for a season.

    It's not looking like something that will satisfy Horse Butte residents (at least what I'm hearing through my own grapevine) who want buffalo there.

    This is better, nevertheless, than bison have under the awful, awful plan in the north.

    But, this does not represent justice for the buffalo, and so we fight on.

    Jim Macdonald
    The Magic of Yellowstone
    Yellowstone Newspaper
    Jim's Eclectic World

  • Great Smoky Mountains National Park Officials to Outline Paving Options for Cades Cove   5 years 41 weeks ago

    Has anyone thought about doing a environmental safe option like using old tires grounded up and laid out in a safe way?