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The latest news from around the National Park System.

Women's March On Washington Could Conflict With Trump Inauguration

A march on Washington to reject the divisive, insulting, and demonizing rhetoric of the presidential campaign could conflict with President-elect Donald Trump's inaugural events, though the National Park Service has not yet ruled out allowing the Gathering for Justice event to include the Lincoln Memorial.
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UPDATED: Latest Speculation On Trump Interior Secretary Points To Washington State Congresswoman

A congresswoman from Washington state who in the past has supported legislation to sell off federal lands was expected to be nominated as Interior secretary for the incoming Trump administration, several media outlets and others reported Friday.
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Senate Holds Fate Of National Park Service Centennial Act

With the House of Representatives already recessed for the year, and the Senate needing to pass a Continuing Resolution to keep the federal government open after midnight Friday, the odds that the National Park Service Centennial Act with its additional funding for the parks would die in the Senate seemed to increase as the hours ticked by.
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UPDATED: Debris Believed From Missing Plane Spotted In Lake Clark National Park And Preserve

Searchers were hoping for good weather Friday that would allow them to go out onto Lake Clark to search for a plane with four aboard that apparently went down into the lake in Lake Clark National Park and Preserve shortly after takeoff from Port Alsworth, Alaska.
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Death In Glacier National Park: Stories Of Accidents And Foolhardiness In The Crown Of The Continent

With visitation to the National Park System this centennial year at an all-time high, it’s no surprise I suppose that more and more people get in trouble, and some of those pay the ultimate price. Every year Glacier National Park in Montana lures hikers, anglers, employees, and climbers to the park’s high peaks, deep lakes, and raging rivers…and some to their own demise.
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Parks Canada Wants Input From Canadians On How Their Parks Should Be Protected, Presented

As Canada prepares to celebrate the 150th anniversary of Confederation, the Minister of Environment and Climate Change and Minister responsible for Parks Canada, Catherine McKenna, invites all Canadians to share their views on how Parks Canada should work to protect and present national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas for the next 50 years.
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Scientists Get Out-Of-This-World Experience At Craters Of The Moon National Monument

Nearly 50 years ago, astronauts from NASA visited Craters of the Moon National Monument to train for their trip to … well, the moon. Today, the rugged, volcanic landscape (some would call it “alien”) in Idaho still serves as a living laboratory for NASA and other scientists.
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Proposed Joint Fossil Regulation Announced For Interior Department’s Managed Lands

The U.S. Department of the Interior On Wednesday announced a proposed rule to further facilitate implementation of the Paleontological Resources Preservation Act of 2009. The proposed rule provides standards for a coordinated approach to the management of paleontological resources on lands managed by four Interior Department Bureaus: Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), and National Park Service (NPS). It will also clarify how these bureaus manage paleontological resources to ensure they are available for current and future generations to enjoy as part of America’s national heritage.
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Small Alpine Insects Are Big Messengers Of Climate Change At Glacier National Park

Two rare alpine insects – native to the northern Rocky Mountains and dependent on cold waters of glacier and snowmelt-fed alpine streams – are imperiled due to climate warming induced glacier and snow loss according to a study by the U.S. Geological Survey and its partners.
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UPDATED: Congress Trying To Pass National Park Service Centennial Act

The House of Representatives moved quickly Tuesday to pass legislation designed to provide the National Park Service with badly needed funds to help the agency chip away at a staggering, $12 billion maintenance backlog. However, without concurrence by the Senate by week's end the measure could die.
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Traveler's View: Federal Lands Poised To Suffer Under Next Interior Secretary

As we wait for the incoming Trump administration to identify its nominee for Interior secretary, we can't help but envision what the outcome could be. Among those said to be under consideration, or jockeying for the job, are retiring U.S. Rep. Cynthia Lummis of Wyoming, U.S. Rep. Rob Bishop of Utah, and Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin, all Republicans who favor energy exploration over conservation.
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